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Getting the 50,000 or three times the actual damages after Foreclosure

16 Oct

Getting the 50,000 or three times the actual damages

sanctions-604x270 (b) After a trustee’s deed upon sale has been recorded, a mortgage
servicer, mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent shall
be liable to a borrower for actual economic damages pursuant to
Section 3281, resulting from a material violation of Section 2923.55,
2923.6, 2923.7, 2924.9, 2924.10, 2924.11, or 2924.17 by that
mortgage servicer, mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized
agent where the violation was not corrected and remedied prior to the
recordation of the trustee’s deed upon sale. If the court finds that
the material violation was intentional or reckless, or resulted from
willful misconduct by a mortgage servicer, mortgagee, trustee,
beneficiary, or authorized agent, the court may award the borrower
the greater of treble actual damages or statutory damages of fifty
thousand dollars ($50,000).

2923.55. (a) A mortgage servicer, mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary,
or authorized agent may not record a notice of default pursuant to
Section 2924 until all of the following:
(1) The mortgage servicer has satisfied the requirements of
paragraph (1) of subdivision (b).
(2) Either 30 days after initial contact is made as required by
paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) or 30 days after satisfying the due
diligence requirements as described in subdivision (f).
(3) The mortgage servicer complies with subdivision (c) of Section
2923.6, if the borrower has provided a complete application as
defined in subdivision (h) of Section 2923.6.
(b) (1) As specified in subdivision (a), a mortgage servicer shall
send the following information in writing to the borrower:
(A) A statement that if the borrower is a servicemember or a
dependent of a servicemember, he or she may be entitled to certain
protections under the federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (50
U.S.C. Appen. Sec. 501 et seq.) regarding the servicemember’s
interest rate and the risk of foreclosure, and counseling for covered
servicemembers that is available at agencies such as Military
OneSource and Armed Forces Legal Assistance.
(B) A statement that the borrower may request the following:
(i) A copy of the borrower’s promissory note or other evidence of
indebtedness.
(ii) A copy of the borrower’s deed of trust or mortgage.
(iii) A copy of any assignment, if applicable, of the borrower’s
mortgage or deed of trust required to demonstrate the right of the
mortgage servicer to foreclose.
(iv) A copy of the borrower’s payment history since the borrower
was last less than 60 days past due.
(2) A mortgage servicer shall contact the borrower in person or by
telephone in order to assess the borrower’s financial situation and
explore options for the borrower to avoid foreclosure. During the
initial contact, the mortgage servicer shall advise the borrower that
he or she has the right to request a subsequent meeting and, if
requested, the mortgage servicer shall schedule the meeting to occur
within 14 days. The assessment of the borrower’s financial situation
and discussion of options may occur during the first contact, or at
the subsequent meeting scheduled for that purpose. In either case,
the borrower shall be provided the toll-free telephone number made
available by the United States Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) to find a HUD-certified housing counseling agency.
Any meeting may occur telephonically.
(c) A notice of default recorded pursuant to Section 2924 shall
include a declaration that the mortgage servicer has contacted the
borrower, has tried with due diligence to contact the borrower as
required by this section, or that no contact was required because the
individual did not meet the definition of “borrower” pursuant to
subdivision (c) of Section 2920.5.
(d) A mortgage servicer’s loss mitigation personnel may
participate by telephone during any contact required by this section.
(e) A borrower may designate, with consent given in writing, a
HUD-certified housing counseling agency, attorney, or other adviser
to discuss with the mortgage servicer, on the borrower’s behalf, the
borrower’s financial situation and options for the borrower to avoid
foreclosure. That contact made at the direction of the borrower shall
satisfy the contact requirements of paragraph (2) of subdivision
(b). Any foreclosure prevention alternative offered at the meeting by
the mortgage servicer is subject to approval by the borrower.
(f) A notice of default may be recorded pursuant to Section 2924
when a mortgage servicer has not contacted a borrower as required by
paragraph (2) of subdivision (b), provided that the failure to
contact the borrower occurred despite the due diligence of the
mortgage servicer. For purposes of this section, “due diligence”
shall require and mean all of the following:
(1) A mortgage servicer shall first attempt to contact a borrower
by sending a first-class letter that includes the toll-free telephone
number made available by HUD to find a HUD-certified housing
counseling agency.
(2) (A) After the letter has been sent, the mortgage servicer
shall attempt to contact the borrower by telephone at least three
times at different hours and on different days. Telephone calls shall
be made to the primary telephone number on file.
(B) A mortgage servicer may attempt to contact a borrower using an
automated system to dial borrowers, provided that, if the telephone
call is answered, the call is connected to a live representative of
the mortgage servicer.
(C) A mortgage servicer satisfies the telephone contact
requirements of this paragraph if it determines, after attempting
contact pursuant to this paragraph, that the borrower’s primary
telephone number and secondary telephone number or numbers on file,
if any, have been disconnected.
(3) If the borrower does not respond within two weeks after the
telephone call requirements of paragraph (2) have been satisfied, the
mortgage servicer shall then send a certified letter, with return
receipt requested, that includes the toll-free telephone number made
available by HUD to find a HUD-certified housing counseling agency.
(4) The mortgage servicer shall provide a means for the borrower
to contact it in a timely manner, including a toll-free telephone
number that will provide access to a live representative during
business hours.
(5) The mortgage servicer has posted a prominent link on the
homepage of its Internet Web site, if any, to the following
information:
(A) Options that may be available to borrowers who are unable to
afford their mortgage payments and who wish to avoid foreclosure, and
instructions to borrowers advising them on steps to take to explore
those options.
(B) A list of financial documents borrowers should collect and be
prepared to present to the mortgage servicer when discussing options
for avoiding foreclosure.
(C) A toll-free telephone number for borrowers who wish to discuss
options for avoiding foreclosure with their mortgage servicer.
(D) The toll-free telephone number made available by HUD to find a
HUD-certified housing counseling agency.
(g) This section shall not apply to entities described in
subdivision (b) of Section 2924.18.
(h) This section shall apply only to mortgages or deeds of trust
described in Section 2924.15.
(i) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1,
2018, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted
statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2018, deletes or extends
that date.

2923.6. (a) The Legislature finds and declares that any duty that
mortgage servicers may have to maximize net present value under their
pooling and servicing agreements is owed to all parties in a loan
pool, or to all investors under a pooling and servicing agreement,
not to any particular party in the loan pool or investor under a
pooling and servicing agreement, and that a mortgage servicer acts in
the best interests of all parties to the loan pool or investors in
the pooling and servicing agreement if it agrees to or implements a
loan modification or workout plan for which both of the following
apply:
(1) The loan is in payment default, or payment default is
reasonably foreseeable.
(2) Anticipated recovery under the loan modification or workout
plan exceeds the anticipated recovery through foreclosure on a net
present value basis.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature that the mortgage servicer
offer the borrower a loan modification or workout plan if such a
modification or plan is consistent with its contractual or other
authority.
(c) If a borrower submits a complete application for a first lien
loan modification offered by, or through, the borrower’s mortgage
servicer, a mortgage servicer, mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or
authorized agent shall not record a notice of default or notice of
sale, or conduct a trustee’s sale, while the complete first lien loan
modification application is pending. A mortgage servicer, mortgagee,
trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent shall not record a notice
of default or notice of sale or conduct a trustee’s sale until any of
the following occurs:
(1) The mortgage servicer makes a written determination that the
borrower is not eligible for a first lien loan modification, and any
appeal period pursuant to subdivision (d) has expired.
(2) The borrower does not accept an offered first lien loan
modification within 14 days of the offer.
(3) The borrower accepts a written first lien loan modification,
but defaults on, or otherwise breaches the borrower’s obligations
under, the first lien loan modification.
(d) If the borrower’s application for a first lien loan
modification is denied, the borrower shall have at least 30 days from
the date of the written denial to appeal the denial and to provide
evidence that the mortgage servicer’s determination was in error.
(e) If the borrower’s application for a first lien loan
modification is denied, the mortgage servicer, mortgagee, trustee,
beneficiary, or authorized agent shall not record a notice of default
or, if a notice of default has already been recorded, record a
notice of sale or conduct a trustee’s sale until the later of:
(1) Thirty-one days after the borrower is notified in writing of
the denial.
(2) If the borrower appeals the denial pursuant to subdivision
(d), the later of 15 days after the denial of the appeal or 14 days
after a first lien loan modification is offered after appeal but
declined by the borrower, or, if a first lien loan modification is
offered and accepted after appeal, the date on which the borrower
fails to timely submit the first payment or otherwise breaches the
terms of the offer.
(f) Following the denial of a first lien loan modification
application, the mortgage servicer shall send a written notice to the
borrower identifying the reasons for denial, including the
following:
(1) The amount of time from the date of the denial letter in which
the borrower may request an appeal of the denial of the first lien
loan modification and instructions regarding how to appeal the
denial.
(2) If the denial was based on investor disallowance, the specific
reasons for the investor disallowance.
(3) If the denial is the result of a net present value
calculation, the monthly gross income and property value used to
calculate the net present value and a statement that the borrower may
obtain all of the inputs used in the net present value calculation
upon written request to the mortgage servicer.
(4) If applicable, a finding that the borrower was previously
offered a first lien loan modification and failed to successfully
make payments under the terms of the modified loan.
(5) If applicable, a description of other foreclosure prevention
alternatives for which the borrower may be eligible, and a list of
the steps the borrower must take in order to be considered for those
options. If the mortgage servicer has already approved the borrower
for another foreclosure prevention alternative, information necessary
to complete the foreclosure prevention alternative.
(g) In order to minimize the risk of borrowers submitting multiple
applications for first lien loan modifications for the purpose of
delay, the mortgage servicer shall not be obligated to evaluate
applications from borrowers who have already been evaluated or
afforded a fair opportunity to be evaluated for a first lien loan
modification prior to January 1, 2013, or who have been evaluated or
afforded a fair opportunity to be evaluated consistent with the
requirements of this section, unless there has been a material change
in the borrower’s financial circumstances since the date of the
borrower’s previous application and that change is documented by the
borrower and submitted to the mortgage servicer.
(h) For purposes of this section, an application shall be deemed
“complete” when a borrower has supplied the mortgage servicer with
all documents required by the mortgage servicer within the reasonable
timeframes specified by the mortgage servicer.
(i) Subdivisions (c) to (h), inclusive, shall not apply to
entities described in subdivision (b) of Section 2924.18.
(j) This section shall apply only to mortgages or deeds of trust
described in Section 2924.15.
(k) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1,
2018, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted
statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2018, deletes or extends
that date.

2923.7. (a) Upon request from a borrower who requests a foreclosure
prevention alternative, the mortgage servicer shall promptly
establish a single point of contact and provide to the borrower one
or more direct means of communication with the single point of
contact.
(b) The single point of contact shall be responsible for doing all
of the following:
(1) Communicating the process by which a borrower may apply for an
available foreclosure prevention alternative and the deadline for
any required submissions to be considered for these options.
(2) Coordinating receipt of all documents associated with
available foreclosure prevention alternatives and notifying the
borrower of any missing documents necessary to complete the
application.
(3) Having access to current information and personnel sufficient
to timely, accurately, and adequately inform the borrower of the
current status of the foreclosure prevention alternative.
(4) Ensuring that a borrower is considered for all foreclosure
prevention alternatives offered by, or through, the mortgage
servicer, if any.
(5) Having access to individuals with the ability and authority to
stop foreclosure proceedings when necessary.
(c) The single point of contact shall remain assigned to the
borrower’s account until the mortgage servicer determines that all
loss mitigation options offered by, or through, the mortgage servicer
have been exhausted or the borrower’s account becomes current.
(d) The mortgage servicer shall ensure that a single point of
contact refers and transfers a borrower to an appropriate supervisor
upon request of the borrower, if the single point of contact has a
supervisor.
(e) For purposes of this section, “single point of contact” means
an individual or team of personnel each of whom has the ability and
authority to perform the responsibilities described in subdivisions
(b) to (d), inclusive. The mortgage servicer shall ensure that each
member of the team is knowledgeable about the borrower’s situation
and current status in the alternatives to foreclosure process.
(f) This section shall apply only to mortgages or deeds of trust
described in Section 2924.15.
(g) (1) This section shall not apply to a depository institution
chartered under state or federal law, a person licensed pursuant to
Division 9 (commencing with Section 22000) or Division 20 (commencing
with Section 50000) of the Financial Code, or a person licensed
pursuant to Part 1 (commencing with Section 10000) of Division 4 of
the Business and Professions Code, that, during its immediately
preceding annual reporting period, as established with its primary
regulator, foreclosed on 175 or fewer residential real properties,
containing no more than four dwelling units, that are located in
California.
(2) Within three months after the close of any calendar year or
annual reporting period as established with its primary regulator
during which an entity or person described in paragraph (1) exceeds
the threshold of 175 specified in paragraph (1), that entity shall
notify its primary regulator, in a manner acceptable to its primary
regulator, and any mortgagor or trustor who is delinquent on a
residential mortgage loan serviced by that entity of the date on
which that entity will be subject to this section, which date shall
be the first day of the first month that is six months after the
close of the calendar year or annual reporting period during which
that entity exceeded the threshold.

2924.9. (a) Unless a borrower has previously exhausted the first
lien loan modification process offered by, or through, his or her
mortgage servicer described in Section 2923.6, within five business
days after recording a notice of default pursuant to Section 2924, a
mortgage servicer that offers one or more foreclosure prevention
alternatives shall send a written communication to the borrower that
includes all of the following information:
(1) That the borrower may be evaluated for a foreclosure
prevention alternative or, if applicable, foreclosure prevention
alternatives.
(2) Whether an application is required to be submitted by the
borrower in order to be considered for a foreclosure prevention
alternative.
(3) The means and process by which a borrower may obtain an
application for a foreclosure prevention alternative.
(b) This section shall not apply to entities described in
subdivision (b) of Section 2924.18.
(c) This section shall apply only to mortgages or deeds of trust
described in Section 2924.15.
(d) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1,
2018, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted
statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2018, deletes or extends
that date.

2924.10. (a) When a borrower submits a complete first lien
modification application or any document in connection with a first
lien modification application, the mortgage servicer shall provide
written acknowledgment of the receipt of the documentation within
five business days of receipt. In its initial acknowledgment of
receipt of the loan modification application, the mortgage servicer
shall include the following information:
(1) A description of the loan modification process, including an
estimate of when a decision on the loan modification will be made
after a complete application has been submitted by the borrower and
the length of time the borrower will have to consider an offer of a
loan modification or other foreclosure prevention alternative.
(2) Any deadlines, including deadlines to submit missing
documentation, that would affect the processing of a first lien loan
modification application.
(3) Any expiration dates for submitted documents.
(4) Any deficiency in the borrower’s first lien loan modification
application.
(b) For purposes of this section, a borrower’s first lien loan
modification application shall be deemed to be “complete” when a
borrower has supplied the mortgage servicer with all documents
required by the mortgage servicer within the reasonable timeframes
specified by the mortgage servicer.
(c) This section shall not apply to entities described in
subdivision (b) of Section 2924.18.
(d) This section shall apply only to mortgages or deeds of trust
described in Section 2924.15.
(e) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1,
2018, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted
statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2018, deletes or extends
that date.

2924.11. (a) If a foreclosure prevention alternative is approved in
writing prior to the recordation of a notice of default, a mortgage
servicer, mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent shall
not record a notice of default under either of the following
circumstances:
(1) The borrower is in compliance with the terms of a written
trial or permanent loan modification, forbearance, or repayment plan.
(2) A foreclosure prevention alternative has been approved in
writing by all parties, including, for example, the first lien
investor, junior lienholder, and mortgage insurer, as applicable, and
proof of funds or financing has been provided to the servicer.
(b) If a foreclosure prevention alternative is approved in writing
after the recordation of a notice of default, a mortgage servicer,
mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent shall not record
a notice of sale or conduct a trustee’s sale under either of the
following circumstances:
(1) The borrower is in compliance with the terms of a written
trial or permanent loan modification, forbearance, or repayment plan.
(2) A foreclosure prevention alternative has been approved in
writing by all parties, including, for example, the first lien
investor, junior lienholder, and mortgage insurer, as applicable, and
proof of funds or financing has been provided to the servicer.
(c) When a borrower accepts an offered first lien loan
modification or other foreclosure prevention alternative, the
mortgage servicer shall provide the borrower with a copy of the fully
executed loan modification agreement or agreement evidencing the
foreclosure prevention alternative following receipt of the executed
copy from the borrower.
(d) A mortgagee, beneficiary, or authorized agent shall record a
rescission of a notice of default or cancel a pending trustee’s sale,
if applicable, upon the borrower executing a permanent foreclosure
prevention alternative. In the case of a short sale, the rescission
or cancellation of the pending trustee’s sale shall occur when the
short sale has been approved by all parties and proof of funds or
financing has been provided to the mortgagee, beneficiary, or
authorized agent.
(e) The mortgage servicer shall not charge any application,
processing, or other fee for a first lien loan modification or other
foreclosure prevention alternative.
(f) The mortgage servicer shall not collect any late fees for
periods during which a complete first lien loan modification
application is under consideration or a denial is being appealed, the
borrower is making timely modification payments, or a foreclosure
prevention alternative is being evaluated or exercised.
(g) If a borrower has been approved in writing for a first lien
loan modification or other foreclosure prevention alternative, and
the servicing of that borrower’s loan is transferred or sold to
another mortgage servicer, the subsequent mortgage servicer shall
continue to honor any previously approved first lien loan
modification or other foreclosure prevention alternative, in
accordance with the provisions of the act that added this section.
(h) This section shall apply only to mortgages or deeds of trust
described in Section 2924.15.
(i) This section shall not apply to entities described in
subdivision (b) of Section 2924.18.
(j) This section shall remain in effect only until January 1,
2018, and as of that date is repealed, unless a later enacted
statute, that is enacted before January 1, 2018, deletes or extends
that date.

2924.17. (a) A declaration recorded pursuant to Section 2923.5 or,
until January 1, 2018, pursuant to Section 2923.55, a notice of
default, notice of sale, assignment of a deed of trust, or
substitution of trustee recorded by or on behalf of a mortgage
servicer in connection with a foreclosure subject to the requirements
of Section 2924, or a declaration or affidavit filed in any court
relative to a foreclosure proceeding shall be accurate and complete
and supported by competent and reliable evidence.
(b) Before recording or filing any of the documents described in
subdivision (a), a mortgage servicer shall ensure that it has
reviewed competent and reliable evidence to substantiate the borrower’
s default and the right to foreclose, including the borrower’s loan
status and loan information.
(c) Until January 1, 2018, any mortgage servicer that engages in
multiple and repeated uncorrected violations of subdivision (b) in
recording documents or filing documents in any court relative to a
foreclosure proceeding shall be liable for a civil penalty of up to
seven thousand five hundred dollars ($7,500) per mortgage or deed of
trust in an action brought by a government entity identified in
Section 17204 of the Business and Professions Code, or in an
administrative proceeding brought by the Department of Business
Oversight or the Bureau of Real Estate against a respective licensee,
in addition to any other remedies available to these entities. This
subdivision shall be inoperative on January 1, 2018.

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Watchdog Report: Foreclosure Review Scrapped On Eve Of Critical, Congressman Says

6 Jan

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Posted: 12/31/2012 3:53 pm EST  |  Updated: 12/31/2012 4:08 pm EST

Foreclosure Review
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The surprising decision by regulators to scrap a massive and expensive foreclosure review program in favor of a $10 billion settlement with 14 banks — reported by The New York Times Sunday night — came after a year of mounting concerns about the independence and effectiveness of the controversial program.

The program, known as the Independent Foreclosure Review, was supposed to give homeowners who believe that their bank made a mistake in handling their foreclosure an opportunity for a neutral third party to review the claim. It’s not clear what factors led banking regulators to abandon the program in favor of a settlement, but the final straw may have been a pending report by the Government Accountability Office, a nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress, which was investigating the review program.

Rep. Brad Miller, a North Carolina Democrat, told The Huffington Post that the report, which has not been released, was “critical” and that the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, which administers the review, was aware of its findings. Miller said that that one problem the GAO was likely to highlight was an “unacceptably high” error rate of 11 percent in a sampling of bank loan files.

The sample files were chosen at random by the banks from their broader pool of foreclosed homeowners, who had not necessarily applied for relief. The data suggests that of the 4 million families who lost their homes to foreclosure since the housing crash, more than 400,000 had some bank-caused problem in their loan file. It also suggests that many thousands of those who could have applied for relief didn’t — because they weren’t aware of the review, or weren’t aware that their bank had made a mistake. Some of these mistakes pushed homeowners into foreclosure who otherwise could have afforded to keep their homes.

Miller said the news that a settlement to replace the review was in the works caught him by surprise, and stressed that he had no way of knowing whether the impending GAO report had triggered the decision.

It’s not clear what will happen to the 250,000 homeowners who have already applied to the Independent Foreclosure Review for relief. The Times, citing people familiar with the negotiations, said that a deal between the banks and banking regulators, led by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, could be reached by the end of the week. It wasn’t clear how that money would be distributed or how many current and former homeowners who lost their homes to foreclosure — or who were hit with an unnecessary fee — might qualify.

Bryan Hubbard, a spokesman for the OCC, which administers the program, declined to comment on the Times’ story. Hubbard told HuffPost, “The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency is committed to ensuring the Independent Foreclosure Review proceeds efficiently and to ensuring harmed borrowers are compensated as quickly as possible.”

Since the housing market crashed in 2007, thousands of foreclosed homeowners have complained that their mortgage company made a mistake in the management of their home loan, such as foreclosing on someone making payments on a loan modification plan. The Independent Foreclosure Review emerged from a legal agreement in April 2011 between 14 mortgage companies and bank regulators over these abusive “servicing” practices. It was supposed to give homeowners an opportunity to have an unbiased third party review their foreclosure and determine whether they might qualify for a cash payout of up to $125,000.

The initial response was tepid, at best. Homeowners and advocates complained that the application forms were confusing and that information about what type of compensation they might get was missing. Some told HuffPost that they were so disillusioned by the federal government’s anemic response to widely reported bank errors that they weren’t going to bother to apply.

In one instance, Daniel Casper, an Illinois wedding videographer, applied to the program in January after years of combat with Bank of America over his home loan. As The Huffington Post reported in October, he was initially rejected, because, according to the bank, his mortgage was not in the foreclosure process during the eligible review period. Promontory Financial Group, which Bank of America hired to review his loan, apparently did not double check Bank of America’s analysis against the extensive documentation that Chase submitted. That documentation clearly showed that his loan was eligible for review.

In recent months ProPublica, an investigative nonprofit, has issued a series of damning articles about the Independent Foreclosure Review. The most recent found that supposedly independent third-party reviewers looking over Bank of America loan files were given the “correct” answers in advance by the bank. These reviewers could override the answers, but they weren’t starting from a blank slate.

Banks, if they did not find a “compensable error,” did not have to pay anything, giving them a strong incentive to find no flaws with their own work.

“It was flawed from the start,” Miller said of the review program. “There was an inherent conflict of interest by just about everyone involved.”

Also on HuffPost:

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California Can Finally Say “Show Me The…..Note!”

26 Oct

Attorneys representing homeowners in all 50 states must undoubtedly feel that their states do not do enough to protect homeowners from preventable foreclosures. In non-judicial states like California, the lack of oversight in the foreclosure process at all levels has led to rampant abuse, fraud and at the very least, negligence. Our courts have done little to diffuse this trend with cases like Chilton v. Federal Nat. Mortg. Ass’n holding: “(n)on-judicial foreclosure under a deed of trust is governed by California Civil Code Section 2924 which relevant section provides that a “trustee, mortgagee or beneficiary or any of their authorized agents” may conduct the foreclosure process.” California courts have held that the Civil Code provisions “cover every aspect” of the foreclosure process, and are “intended to be exhaustive.” There is no requirement that the party initiating foreclosure be in possession of the original note.

Chilton and many other rulings refuse to acknowledge that homeowners have any rights to challenge wrongful foreclosures including Gomes v Countrywide, Fontenot v Wells Fargo, and a long line of tender cases holding that a plaintiff seeking to set aside a foreclosure sale must first allege tender of the amount of the secured indebtedness. Complicating matters further is the conflict between state, federal and bankruptcy cases regarding Civil Code 2932.5 and the requirement of recording an assignment prior to proceeding to foreclosure.
While the specific terms are still evolving, the http://www.nationalmortgagesettlement.com/ information website has released the Servicing Standards Highlights that set forth the basic changes that the banks and servicers have agreed to as part of the settlement. When the AG Settlement is finalized, it will be reduced to a judgment that can be enforced by federal judges, the special independent monitor Joseph Smith, federal agencies and Attorneys General. This judgment can be used by attorneys to define a standard and therefore allow us to fashion a remedy that will improve our chances of obtaining relief for our clients.

Lean Forward

Many have opined about the deficiencies in the AG Settlement, from the lack of investigation to inadequacy of the dollars committed to compensate for wrongful foreclosures, principal reduction or refinancing. The reality is, as tainted as it may be, the AG Settlement leaves us better off than were were for future cases. It does not however, address past wrongs in any meaningful way. The terms make it abundantly clear that this is not the settlement for compensation; if there is any remote possibility of compensation it must be sought in the OCC Independent Foreclosure Review and the homeowner must meet the extreme burden of proving financial harm caused by the wrongful foreclosure. For California, the AG Settlement at best, improves our ability to request crucial documents to challenge wrongful foreclosures which previously were difficult if not impossible to obtain. This will allow us to negotiate better loss mitigation options for clients.

Loan Modification 2008-2011

The homeowner submits an application 10 times, pays on 3 different trial plans, speaks to 24 different representatives who give him various inconsistent versions of status. After two years, and thousands of default fees later, he is advised that the investor won’t approve a modification and foreclosure is imminent. Actually, the truth was that the homeowner was in fact qualified for the modification, the data used for the NPV analysis was incorrect and the investor had in fact approved hundreds of modifications according to guidelines that were known to the servicer from the beginning. How could the AG Settlement not improve on this common scenario?

Foreclosure Rules
14 days prior to initiating foreclosure, the servicer must provide the homeowner with notice which must include:

facts supporting the bank’s right to foreclose
payment history
a copy of the note with endorsements
the identity of the investor
amount of delinquency and terms to bring loan current
summary of loss mitigation efforts
A prompt review of the 14 Day Pre Foreclosure Notice and investigation regarding the securitization aspects of the case can result in the filing of a lawsuit and request for TRO if all terms have not been complied with or the documents provided do not establish the right to foreclose. There will be no issue of tender, prejudice or show me the note that can be raised in opposition by defendants and this is an opportunity that we have not been afforded under current case law. Additionally, a loan level review will reveal improper fees and charges that can be challenged. Deviation from the AG Settlement Servicing Standards should be aggressively pursued through the proper complaint channels.

Loan Modification Guidelines

Notify the homeowner of all loss mitigation options
Servicer shall offer a loan modification if NPV positive
HAMP trial plans shall promptly be converted to permanent modifications
Servicer must review and make determination within 30 days of receipt of complete package
Homeowner must submit package within 120 days of delinquency to receive answer prior to referral to foreclosure (could be problematic since most homeowners are more than 120 days late)
After the loan has been referred to foreclosure, the homeowner must apply for a loan modification within 15 days before sale. Servicer must expedite review.
Servicer must cease all collection efforts while a complete loan modification package is under review or homeowner is making timely trial modification payments
Other significant terms include the requirement that the servicer maintain loan portals where the homeowner can check status which must be updated every ten days, assign a single point of contact to every loan, restriction on default fees and forced placed insurance, modification denials must state reasons and provide document support and the homeowner has 30 days to appeal a negative decision.

Short Sales Will Now Really Be Short

The rules regarding short sales will greatly increase the chances that short sales will be processed in a timely manner and accordingly, will result in more short sales being closed.

Banks/servicers must make short sale requirements public
Banks/servicers must provide a short sale price evaluation upon request by the homeowner prior to listing the property
Receipt of short sale packages must be confirmed and notification of missing documents must be provided within 30 days
Knowledge of all of the new requirements for processing foreclosures, loan modifications and short sales can greatly increase our chances of obtaining successful outcomes for clients. Resolution is the goal, and now, we may have leverage that did not exist before.

What is a Wrongful Foreclosure Action?

29 Aug

The pretender lender does not have the loan and did not invest any of the servicers money. Yet these frauds are occurring every day. They did not loan you the money yet they are the ones foreclosing, taking the bail out money, the mortgage insurance, and then throwing it back on the investor for the loss. We could stop them if a few plaintiffs where awarded multi million dollar verdicts for wrongful foreclosure.
A wrongful foreclosure action typically occurs when the lender starts a non judicial foreclosure action when it simply has no legal cause. Wrongful foreclosure actions are also brought when the service providers accept partial payments after initiation of the wrongful foreclosure process, and then continue on with the foreclosure process. These predatory lending strategies, as well as other forms of misleading homeowners, are illegal.

The borrower is the one that files a wrongful disclosure action with the court against the service provider, the holder of the note and if it is a non-judicial foreclosure, against the trustee complaining that there was an illegal, fraudulent or willfully oppressive sale of property under a power of sale contained in a mortgage or deed or court judicial proceeding. The borrower can also allege emotional distress and ask for punitive damages in a wrongful foreclosure action.
Causes of Action

Wrongful foreclosure actions may allege that the amount stated in the notice of default as due and owing is incorrect because of the following reasons:

Incorrect interest rate adjustment
Incorrect tax impound accounts
Misapplied payments
forbearance agreement which was not adhered to by the servicer
Unnecessary forced place insurance,
Improper accounting for a confirmed chapter 11 or chapter 13 bankruptcy plan.
Breach of contract
Intentional infliction of emotional distress
Negligent infliction of emotional distress
Unfair Business Practices
Quiet title
Wrongful foreclosure

Injunction

Any time prior to the foreclosure sale, a borrower can apply for an injunction with the intent of stopping the foreclosure sale until issues in the lawsuit are resolved. The wrongful foreclosure lawsuit can take anywhere from ten to twenty-four months. Generally, an injunction will only be issued by the court if the court determines that: (1) the borrower is entitled to the injunction; and (2) that if the injunction is not granted, the borrower will be subject to irreparable harm.
Damages Available to Borrower

Damages available to a borrower in a wrongful foreclosure action include: compensation for the detriment caused, which are measured by the value of the property, emotional distress and punitive damages if there is evidence that the servicer or trustee committed fraud, oppression or malice in its wrongful conduct. If the borrower’s allegations are true and correct and the borrower wins the lawsuit, the servicer will have to undue or cancel the foreclosure sale, and pay the borrower’s legal bills.
Why Do Wrongful Foreclosures Occur?

Wrongful foreclosure cases occur usually because of a miscommunication between the lender and the borrower. This could be as a result of an incorrectly applied payment, an error in interest charges and completely inaccurate information communicated between the lender and borrower. Some borrowers make the situation worse by ignoring their monthly statements and not promptly responding in writing to the lender’s communications. Many borrowers just assume that the lender will correct any inaccuracies or errors. Any one of these actions can quickly turn into a foreclosure action. Once an action is instituted, then the borrower will have to prove that it is wrongful or unwarranted. This is done by the borrower filing a wrongful foreclosure action. Costs are expensive and the action can take time to litigate.
Impact

The wrongful foreclosure will appear on the borrower’s credit report as a foreclosure, thereby ruining the borrower’s credit rating. Inaccurate delinquencies may also accompany the foreclosure on the credit report. After the foreclosure is found to be wrongful, the borrower must then petition to get the delinquencies and foreclosure off the credit report. This can take a long time and is emotionally distressing.

Wrongful foreclosure may also lead to the borrower losing their home and other assets if the borrower does not act quickly. This can have a devastating affect on a family that has been displaced out of their home. However, once the borrower’s wrongful foreclosure action is successful in court, the borrower may be entitled to compensation for their attorney fees, court costs, pain, suffering and emotional distress caused by the action. Fortunately, these wrongful foreclosure incidences are rare. The majority of foreclosures occur as a result of the borrower defaulting on their mortgage payments.

Mortgage paperwork mess: Next housing shock?

7 May

Scott Pelley reports how problems with mortgage documents are prompting lawsuits and could slow down the weak housing market

  • Play CBS Video Video The next housing shockAs more and more Americans face mortgage foreclosure, banks’ crucial ownership documents for the properties are often unclear and are sometimes even bogus, a condition that’s causing lawsuits and hampering an already weak housing market. Scott Pelley reports.
  • Video Extra: Eviction reprieveFlorida residents AJ and Brenda Boyd spent more than a year trying to renegotiate their mortgage and save their home. At the last moment, questions about who owns their mortgage saved them from eviction.
  • Video Extra: “Save the Dream” eventsBruce Marks, founder and CEO of the nonprofit Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America talks to Scott Pelley about his “Save the Dream” events and how foreclosures are causing a crisis in America.
(CBS News)If there was a question about whether we’re headed for a second housing shock, that was settled last week with news that home prices have fallen a sixth consecutive month. Values are nearly back to levels of the Great Recession. One thing weighing on the economy is the huge number of foreclosed houses.Many are stuck on the market for a reason you wouldn’t expect: banks can’t find the ownership documents.Who really owns your mortgage?
Scott Pelley explains a bizarre aftershock of the U.S. financial collapse: An epidemic of forged and missing mortgage documents.

It’s bizarre but, it turns out, Wall Street cut corners when it created those mortgage-backed investments that triggered the financial collapse. Now that banks want to evict people, they’re unwinding these exotic investments to find, that often, the legal documents behind the mortgages aren’t there. Caught in a jam of their own making, some companies appear to be resorting to forgery and phony paperwork to throw people – down on their luck – out of their homes.

In the 1930s we had breadlines; venture out before dawn in America today and you’ll find mortgage lines. This past January in Los Angeles, 37,000 homeowners facing foreclosure showed up to an event to beg their bank for lower payments on their mortgage. Some people even slept on the sidewalk to get in line.

So many in the country are desperate now that they have to meet in convention centers coast to coast.

In February in Miami, 12,000 people showed up to a similar event. The line went down the block and doubled back twice.

Video: The next housing shock
Extra: Eviction reprieve
Extra: “Save the Dream” events

Dale DeFreitas lost her job and now fears her home is next. “It’s very emotional because I just think about it. I don’t wanna lose my home. I really don’t,” she told “60 Minutes” correspondent Scott Pelley.

“It’s your American dream,” he remarked.

“It was. And still is,” she replied.

These convention center events are put on by the non-profit Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America, which helps people figure what they can afford, and then walks them across the hall to bank representatives to ask for lower payments. More than half will get their mortgages adjusted, but the rest discover that they just can’t keep their home.

For many that’s when the real surprise comes in: these same banks have fouled up all of their own paperwork to a historic degree.

“In my mind this is an absolute, intentional fraud,” Lynn Szymoniak, who is fighting foreclosure, told Pelley.

While trying to save her house, she discovered something we did not know: back when Wall Street was using algorithms and computers to engineer those disastrous mortgage-backed securities, it appears they didn’t want old fashioned paperwork slowing down the profits.

“This was back when it was a white hot fevered pitch to move as many of these as possible,” Pelley remarked.

“Exactly. When you could make a whole lotta money through securitization. And every other aspect of it could be done electronically, you know, key strokes. This was the only piece where somebody was supposed to actually go get documents, transfer the documents from one entity to the other. And it looks very much like they just eliminated that stuff all together,” Szymoniak said.

Szymoniak’s mortgage had been bundled with thousands of others into one of those Wall Street securities traded from investor to investor. When the bank took her to court, it first said it had lost her documents, including the critical assignment of mortgage which transfers ownership. But then, there was a courthouse surprise.

“They found all of your paperwork more than a year after they initially said that they had lost it?” Pelley asked.

“Yes,” she replied.

Asked if that seemed suspicious to her, Szymoniak said, “Yes, absolutely. What do you imagine? It fell behind the file cabinet? Where was all of this? ‘We had it, we own it, we lost it.’ And then more recently, everyone is coming in saying, ‘Hey we found it. Isn’t that wonderful?’”

But what the bank may not have known is that Szymoniak is a lawyer and fraud investigator with a specialty in forged documents. She has trained FBI agents.

She told Pelley she asked for copies of those documents.

Asked what she found, Szymoniak told Pelley, “When I looked at the assignment of my mortgage, and this is the assignment: it looked that even the date they put in, which was 10/17/08, was several months after they sued me for foreclosure. So, what they were saying to the court was, ‘We sued her in July of 2008 and we acquired this mortgage in October of 2008.’ It made absolutely no sense.”

Produced by Robert Anderson and Daniel Ruetenik

Now for the pleading

Timothy L. McCandless, Esq. SBN 147715

LAW OFFICES OF TIMOTHY L. MCCANDLESS

1881 Business Center Drive, Ste. 9A

San Bernardino, CA 92392

Tel:  909/890-9192

Fax: 909/382-9956

Attorney for Plaintiffs

 

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

 

COUNTY OF ____________

___________________________________,And ROES 1 through 5,000,

Plaintiff,

v.

SAND CANYON CORPORATION f/k/a OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION; AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Trustee for SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT2; DOCX, LLC; and PREMIER TRUST DEED SERVICES and all persons unknown claiming any legal or  equitable right, title, estate, lien, or interest  in the property described in the complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud on Plaintiff’s  title thereto, Does 1 through 10, Inclusive,

Defendants.

CASE NO:FIRST AMENDED COMPLAINT

FOR QUIET TITLE, DECLARATORY RELIEF, TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER, PRELIMINARY INJUNTION AND PERMANENT INJUNCTION, CANCELATION OF INSTRUMENT AND FOR DAMAGES ARISING FROM:

SLANDER OF TITLE; TORTUOUS

VIOLATION OF STATUTE [Penal

Code § 470(b) – (d); NOTARY FRAUD;

///

///

///

///

Plaintiffs ___________________________ allege herein as follows:

GENERAL ALLEGATIONS

            1.         Plaintiffs ___________ (hereinafter individually and collectively referred to as “___________”), were and at all times herein mentioned are,  residents of the County of _________, State of California and the lawful owner of a parcel of real property commonly known as: _________________, California _______ and the legal description is:

Parcel No. 1:

A.P.N. No. _________ (hereinafter “Subject Property”).

2.         At all times herein mentioned, SAND CANYON CORPORATION f/k/a OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION (hereinafter SAND CANYON”), is and was, a corporation existing by virtue of the laws of the State of California and claims an interest adverse to the right, title and interests of Plaintiff in the Subject Property.

3.         At all times herein mentioned, Defendant AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. (hereinafter “AMERICAN”), is and was, a corporation existing by virtue of the laws of the State of Delaware, and at all times herein mentioned was conducting ongoing business in the State of California.

4.         At all times herein mentioned, Defendant WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Trustee for SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT2 (hereinafter referred to as “WELLS FARGO”), is and was, a member of the National Banking Association and makes an adverse claim to the Plaintiff MADRIDS’ right, title and interest in the Subject Property.

5.         At all times herein mentioned, Defendant DOCX, L.L.C. (hereinafter “DOCX”), is and was, a limited liability company existing by virtue of the laws of the State of Georgia, and a subsidiary of Lender Processing Services, Inc., a Delaware corporation.

6.         At all times herein mentioned, __________________, was a company existing by virtue of its relationship as a subsidiary of __________________.

7.         Plaintiffs are ignorant of the true names and capacities of Defendants sued herein as DOES I through 10, inclusive, and therefore sues these Defendants by such fictitious names and all persons unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the property described in the complaint adverse to Plaintiffs’ title, or any cloud on Plaintiffs’ title thereto. Plaintiffs will amend this complaint as required to allege said Doe Defendants’ true names and capacities when such have been fully ascertained. Plaintiffs further allege that Plaintiffs designated as ROES 1 through 5,000, are Plaintiffs who share a commonality with the same Defendants, and as the Plaintiffs listed herein.

8.         Plaintiffs are informed and believe and thereon allege that at all times herein mentioned, Defendants, and each of them, were the agent and employee of each of the remaining Defendants.

9.         Plaintiffs allege that each and every defendants, and each of them, allege herein ratified the conduct of each and every other Defendant.

10.       Plaintiffs allege that at all times said Defendants, and each of them, were acting within the purpose and scope of such agency and employment.

11.       Plaintiffs are informed and believe and thereupon allege that circa July 2004, DOCX was formed with the specific intent of manufacturing fraudulent documents in order create the false impression that various entities obtained valid, recordable interests in real

properties, when in fact they actually maintained no lawful interest in said properties.

12.       Plaintiffs are informed and believe and thereupon allege that as a regular and ongoing part of the business of Defendant DOCX was to have persons sitting around a table signing names as quickly as possible, so that each person executing documents would sign approximately 2,500 documents per day. Although the persons signing the documents claimed to be a vice president of a particular bank of that document, in fact, the party signing the name was not the person named on the document, as such the signature was a forgery, that the name of the person claiming to be a vice president of a particular financial institution was not a “vice president”, did not have any prior training in finance, never worked for the company they allegedly purported to be a vice president of, and were alleged to be a vice president simultaneously with as many as twenty different banks and/or lending institutions.

13.       Plaintiffs are informed and believe and thereupon allege that the actual signatories of the instruments set forth in Paragraph 12 herein, were intended to and were fraudulently notarized by a variety of notaries in the offices of DOCX in Alpharetta, GA.

14.       Plaintiffs are informed and believe and thereupon allege that for all purposes the intent of Defendant DOCX was to intentionally create fraudulent documents, with forged signatures, so that said documents could be recorded in the Offices of County Recorders through the United States of America, knowing that such documents would forgeries, contained false information, and that the recordation of such documents would affect an interest in real property in violation of law.

15.       Plaintiffs allege that on or about, ____________, that they conveyed a first deed of  trust (hereinafter “DEED”) in favor of Option One Mortgage, Inc. with an interest of

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Robo-signers List

25 Mar

COMPLETE GUIDE TO ROBO-SIGNERS 

FOR NEWEST LIST OF ROBO-SIGNERS  SEE http://takeyourhomeback.com/?p=428

FORECLOSURE SELF-DEFENSE COMPLETE GUIDE TO ROBO-SIGNERS *

* IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM LOCATING THE NAME/INFO YOU WANT-SEND US AN EMAIL (AT BOTTOM OF ARTICLE) AND WE WILL ASSIST

What is a robo-signer?

Robo-signers are mortgage lending company employees who prepared and signed off on foreclosures without reviewing them, as the law requires. Jeffrey Stephan, the GMAC employee who was the first identified as a robo-signer, has acknowledged in sworn deposition that he prepared 400 such foreclosures a day. The discovery of robo-signers could simply be the tip of the iceberg. If so, more revelations could only increase the pressure on large banks. Their potential exposure to losses could skyrocket.

What’s the significance?

The “robo-signing of affidavits and Assignments of Mortgage and all other mortgage foreclosure documents served to cover up the fact that loan servicers cannot demonstrate the facts required to conduct a lawful foreclosure. If it turns out that robo-signers did indeed sign off on loans without review, they committed fraud by claiming knowledge of a financial matter of which they had no personal knowledge. It could also mean that some people are wrongly being evicted from their houses.

From underwriting fraudulent mortgages; to shuffling it through the mortgage securitization chain without following proper legal procedures like the simple act of passing along paperwork; to concealing or doctoring basic facts when securitizing the mortgages and selling them to investors, large lenders and their partners on Wall Street could face hundreds of billions of dollars in losses by being forced to buy back faulty mortgages, some of which have already defaulted, from misled investors.

Investors bought mortgage-linked securities with the promise that the underlying mortgages conformed to basic underwriting standards, and that proper procedures were followed in the chain of securitization and a tax-exempt status. Steep losses on those investments and the discovery of potentially fraudulent activity are pushing investors to force banks to buy them back.

With all of the press robo-signing has gotten, it is a bit surprising that everyone is having such a hard time concluding whether these practices effect non-judicial foreclosures.
The topic has not gotten the treatment it deserves, I will try to help. The following are by no means a complete list, but are the most clear LEGAL reasons (setting aside pure moral questions and the U.S. Constitution) that the Robo-Signer Controversy will entitle hundreds of thousands of homeowners wrongfully foreclosed and evicted to sue in non-judicial foreclosure states.

Briefly, Robo Signers are illegal because fraud cannot be the basis of clear title, trustee’s deeds following Robo Signed sales are void as a matter of law, notarization is a recording requirement for many of the documents, which we also know was often botched, and most importantly because robo signed falsifications ARE meant for use in court, including unlawful detainers and bankruptcy matters.

Clear Title May Not Derive From A Fraud (including a bona fide purchaser for value).
In the case of a fraudulent transaction the law is well settled.

Numerous authorities have established the rule that an instrument wholly void, such as an undelivered deed, a forged instrument, or a deed in blank, cannot be made the foundation of a good title, even under the equitable doctrine of bona fide purchase. Consequently, the fact that purchaser acted in good faith in dealing with persons who apparently held legal title, is not in itself sufficient basis for relief.

It is the general rule that courts have power to vacate a foreclosure sale where there has been fraud in the procurement of the foreclosure decree or where the sale has been improperly, unfairly or unlawfully conducted, or is tainted by fraud, or where there has been such a mistake that to allow it to stand would be inequitable to purchaser and parties.

Hence, if forged Robo Signed signatures are used to obtain the foreclosure, it CERTAINLY makes a difference in non-judicial foreclosure states as well as judicial states.

Any apparent sale based on Robo Signed documents is void – without any legal effect – like Monopoly Money.

In turn, the law requires that the beneficiary execute and notarize and record a substitution for a valid substitution of trustee to take effect. Thus, if the Assignment of Deed of Trust/ Mortgage is robo-signed, the sale is void. If the substitution of trustee is robo-signed, the sale is void. If the Notice of Default is Robo-Signed, the sale is void.

These documents are not recordable without good notarization.The reason these documents are notarized in the first place is because otherwise they will not be accepted by the County recorder. Moreover, a notary who helps commit real estate fraud is liable.

Once the document is recorded, however, it is entitled to a “presumption of validity”, which is what spurned the falsification trend in the first place. Therefore, the notarization of a false signature not only constitutes fraud, but is every bit intended as part of a larger conspiracy to commit fraud on the court.

The documents are intended for court proceedings. A necessary purpose for these documents, AFTER the non judicial foreclosure, is the eviction of the rightful owners afterward. While the foreclosures are non-judicial, evictions afterwards still are conducted in court, although the process moves quickly and is mostly a “rubber stamping” by skeptical judges. However, as demonstrated below, once these documents make it into court, the bank officers and lawyers become guilty of FELONIES:

The Doctrine of Unclean Hands provides: plaintiff’s misconduct in the matter before the court makes his hands “unclean” and he may not hold with them the pristine remedy of injunctive relief. The unclean hands rule requires that the Plaintiff not cheat, and behave fairly. The plaintiff must come into court with clean hands, and keep them clean, or he or she will be denied relief, regardless of the merits of the claim. Whether the doctrine applies is a question of fact.

Robo Signed Documents Are Intended for Use in Bankruptcy Court Matters. One majorly overlooked facet is the extremely active bankruptcy court proceedings, where, just as in judicial foreclosure states, the banks must prove “standing” to proceed with a foreclosure. If they are not signed by persons with the requisite knowledge, affidavits submitted in bankruptcy court proceedings such as objections to a plan and Relief from Stays are perjured. The documents in support are often falsified evidence. Conclusion

Verified eviction complaints, perjured motions for summary judgment, and all other eviction paperwork after robo signed non judicial foreclosures are illegal and void. The paperwork itself is void. The sale is void. But the only way to clean up the hundreds of thousands of effected titles is through litigation, because even now the banks will simply not do the right thing. And that’s why robo signers count in non-judicial foreclosure states. Victims of robosigners in may seek declaratory relief and damages, an injunction and attorney’s fees for Unfair Business practices, as well as claims for slander of title; abuse of process, civil theft, and variety of other civil remedies. 

Final words: the “Robo” actions are just the tip of the iceberg but the “Robo” actions allowed part of the iceberg to be seen.

For the complete Congressional Written Report go to : http://www.foreclosureself-defense.com/downloads/Congressional_Foreclosure_Report.pdf

Admission by Florida Law Group- http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/37452927-FDLG-Admits-to-Violation-of-Professional-Conduct-Code-Jeffrey-Stephan-Affidavits.pdf,

TOP INDICATORS/SIGNS YOU PROBABLY HAVE A FALSE DOCUMENTS AND A VICTIM OF FORECLOSURE FRAUD

  1. Any document signed by an officer of MERS. MERS states at www.mersinc.org that: Employees of the servicer will be certifying officers of MERS. This means they are authorized to sign any necessary documents as an officer of MERS. The certifying officer is granted this power by a corporate resolution from MERS. In other words, the same individual that signs the documents for the servicer will continue to sign the documents, but now as an officer of MERS.
  2. The signor of the document states that they are acting “solely as nominee” for some other party.
  3. The document was notarized in Dakota County, Minnesota
  4. The document was notarized in Hinnepin County, Minnesota
  5. The document was notarized in Duval County, Florida
  6. The document was notarized in Palm Beach County, Florida
  7.  The document was notarized in Pinellas County Florida
  8. The document was notarized in San Diego County, CA
  9.  The document was notarized in Fulton County, GA
  10.  The document was notarized in Polk County, IA
  11.  The document was notarized in Travis County, Texas
  12.  The document was notarized in Harris County, Texas
  13.  The document was notarized in Salt Lake County, Utah
  14. The document was execute the same day it was filed with the Court
  15. The party who signed the document executed it as “an authorized agent” for the servicer or the Plaintiff.
  16. The party who signed the document executed it as “an attorney in fact” for the servicer or the Plaintiff.
  17. The name of the signing party is stamped on the documents in block letters.
  18. The name of the servicer or Plaintiff is stamped on the document in block letters.
  19.  The document appears to be a standard form with “fill-in-the-blanks” for the names of the signors and entities.
  20.  The paragraph numbers are not consistent (for example the first page may end with paragraph 7 and the second page may start with paragraph 10)
  21.  The party who signed the document and the notary are the same person.
  22.  You cannot read the signature of the signor and the name is not printed out on the document. (some people refer to these a “squiggle marks”) The bottom line is you cannot decipher any name or word on the document.
  23.  The signature on the document consists of one loop in the shape of an “S” or something that looks like an “8”.
  24.  The date of the signature and the date of the notarization are not the same.
  25.  The same “officer” or Vice President” of a mortgage company or lender is also the “Vice President” or “officer” of many other entities or lenders in the chain of assignments or endorsements.
  26.  The same “officer” or “ Vice President” of a lender signing the documents is located in various cities throughout the United States.
  27.   The document includes numerous pre-stamped names and signatures.
  28.  The document includes a second page or last page notarization that does not conform in type font, style, format, texture, age, from the primary pages of the document.
  29.  Backdating effective dates on assignments.
  30.  Signatures of officers are dated years after an entity has been out of business, merged with another company or filed for bankruptcy.
  31.   The party who signed the document executed it as a representative of the servicer. 
  32.  The notary failed to attach a notarial seal. 
  33.  The notary failed to sign the notarization. 
  34.  The name of the party appearing before the notary is blank. 
  35.  The name of the party appearing before the notary is block stamped. 
  36.  The endorsement is not at the foot of the note, but on a separate page or allonge to the note. (if there is room at the foot of the note, the endorsement must appear there. An allonge may only be used if there is insufficient room at the foot of the note for the endorsement) 
  37.  The document purports to assign the mortgage or the deed of trust from the originator directly to the trust. 
  38.  The document that purports to assign the mortgage of deed of trust to the Trust is dated BEFORE the Trust was registered with the SEC.
  39.  The document that purports to assign the mortgage of deed of trust to the Trust was signed AFTER        the cut-off date for the transfer of all such to the  Trust pursuant to the Pooling and Servicing Agreement.
  40.  The origination date on the mortgage note is not within the origination and cut-off dates provided for by the terms of the Pooling and Servicing Agreement.
  41.  The mortgage note is assigned rather than endorsed from Party “A” to Party “B” or from any party to another party or entity.
  42.  The mortgage note is endorsed from the originator to the securitized Trust.
  43.  The mortgage note is endorsed from the originator to the current mortgage servicer.
  44.  The mortgage note is endorsed from the originator to the depositor for the securitized trust.
  45.  The affidavit is a “Lost Note Affidavit” filed by the mortgage servicer.
  46.  The affidavit is a “Lost Note Affidavit” filed by the Trustee for the securitized Trust and claims they never received the original Note. ( You can only file a lost note affidavit under the UCC if you possessed the Note before it was lost)
  47.  The assignment of mortgage or deed of trust was filed or signed after the filing of the bankruptcy case.
  48. The assignment of mortgage or deed of trust was filed or signed after the foreclosure proceeding began/was filed.
  49.  The assignment of mortgage or deed of trust was filed or signed after the filing of the Motion for Relief from Stay in Bankruptcy Court.
  50.  The affidavit was signed by an employee  MR Default Servicers or has the MR Default Servicers information on the document as an identification number.
  51.  The affidavit was signed by an employee  Promiss Solutions or has the Promiss Solutions information on the document as an identification number.
  52.  The affidavit was signed by an employee  NDEx Technologies, LLC or has the NDEx  information on the document as an identification number.
  53.  The affidavit was signed by the same attorney that signed the foreclosure complaint.
  54. The affidavit was filed by an employee of the attorney that filed the foreclosure complaint.
  55.  The documents are clearly two photocopies of the same document with different information filled in regarding the names of the assignor and assignee.
  56. The Note is stamped with the following: “Certified True Copy”.
  57.  The signature of the Vice President states that they are a Vice President of Lehman Brother Holding Company, but the printed or stamped name on the document is Lehman Brothers Bank, FSB.
  58.  The document is signed by a “Bank Officer” without any designation of the office/position held.
  59.  The affidavit is signed by the “designated agent” of any entity or party.
  60.  The affidavit includes one or more bar codes. ( Similar to the bar codes you see on items at the grocery store, etc.)
  61.  Any document signed by an individual who states that they are the “legal coordinator” for any entity involved in the lawsuit or chain of custody.
  62.  The return address on the Assignment or affidavit is to a third party provider, such as Financial Dimensions, Inc, FANDO or FNFS.
  63.  The transferor and the transferee  have the exact same physical address including the same street and/or P.O. box numbers.
  64.  The document bears the image: “This is not a certified copy”
  65.  The document refers to a Power of Attorney, but no such document is attached or filed and recorded.

PLEASE NOTE: FOR YOUR CONVIENENCE  TO LOCATE A PERSON A “FIND” FEATURE HAS BEEN INSTALLED ON THIS SECTION.

INSTRUCTIONS: PRESS THE CONTROL KEY AND THE “F” KEY AT THE SAME TIME, A BOX WILL APPEAR, TYPE IN THE NAME OR PART OF THE NAME YOU ARE LOOKING FOR AND THE SITE WILL TAKE YOU TO IT.

KNOWN ALLEGED ROBO-SIGNERS 

Cheryl Samons–  the person which may have been responsible for more Floridians losing their homes  than any other person in the state – Ms. Samons was in fact the Office Manager of the Law Offices of David J. Stern and supervised the other Robo-Signers. see full deposition at http://4closurefraud.org/2010/02/23/full-deposition-of-the-soon-to-be-infamous-cheryl-samons-re-deutsche-bank-national-trust-company-as-trustee-for-morgan-stanley-abs-capital-inc-plaintiff-vs-belourdes-pierre-50-2008-ca-028558-xx/ For different signatures see http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Samons_Cheryl.GIF, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Samons_Cheryl.1.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/BsIiyb-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/NY4Csi-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Snowbound.pdf,  http://www.palmbeachpost.com/money/real-estate/foreclosure-robo-signers-appear-to-be-widespread-968114.html

Tammie Lou Kapusta – David J. Stern former employee- see Attorney General’s full deposition at http://www.scribd.com/doc/38890568/Full-Deposition-of-Tammie-Lou-Kapusta-Law-Office-of-David-J-Stern                                                                                                 http://www.palmbeachpost.com/money/real-estate/foreclosure-robo-signers-appear-to-be-widespread-968114.html 

Beth Cerniemployee of David J. Stern- see full deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/WM1_FULL-DEPOSITION-OF-LAW-OFFICES-OF-DAVID-J.-STERN-BETH-CERNI.pdf 

Mary R. Cordova– employee at David J. Stern. See Attorney General’s full depo of Sept 23, 2010 at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Copy-of-WM-FULL-DEPOSITION-TRANSCRIPT-OF-MARY-CARDOVA-OF-LAW-OFFICES-OF-DAVID-J.-STERN.pdf 

Kelly Scott– employee at David J. Stern, P.A. , legal assistant to Cheryl Samons. See Attorney General’s full deposition of October 4, 2010 at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/WM_FULL-DEPOSITION-TRANSCRIPT-OF-KELLY-SCOTT-OF-LAW-OFFICES-OF-DAVID-J.-STERN.pdf 

Shannon Smith– employee of David J. Stern, P.A. Illegally claimed she is a paralegal, lacks any credentials and not certified, false notarization. See full depo at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/FULL-DEPOSITION-OF-DAVID-J.-STERNS-SHANNON-SMITH.pdf 

Kathy Smith–   Employee at Lender Processing Services see more info at http://www.foreclosurehamlet.org/profiles/blogs/robosigners-michelle-halyard , and signature and false credentials at http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Smith_Kathy.2.pdf http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kaminski_Joseph.6.pdf , http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Corrective+Assignment%5b2%5d.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Gx12P0-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Linda%20Green%20no%20authority%20to%20sign%20on%20behalf%20of%20MERS%20Sept%202009.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Sanisidro%20Garcia%20Aff%20Lost%20Note%20by%20Kathy%20Smith.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Linda%20Green%20no%20authority%20to%20sign%20on%20behalf%20of%20MERS%20Sept%202009.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Corrective+Assignment%5b2%5d.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_42_4247609_img.pdf.pdf,

Joseph Kaminski– Employee at Lender Processing Services, see signature and false credentials at http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Smith_Kathy.2.pdf  , http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kaminski_Joseph.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kaminski_Joseph.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kaminski_Joseph.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kaminski_Joseph.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kaminski_Joseph.6.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Corrective+Assignment%5b2%5d.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Gx12P0-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Linda%20Green%20no%20authority%20to%20sign%20on%20behalf%20of%20MERS%20Sept%202009.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Corrective+Assignment%5b2%5d.pdf,  

Michelle Hayard– see more info at http://www.foreclosurehamlet.org/profiles/blogs/robosigners-michelle-halyard 

Caryn Graham– Sr. Attorney at Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson. See http://livinglies.wordpress.com/2010/03/29/caryn-a-graham-%E2%80%93-mers-assistant-secretary-bofa-countrywide-wells-fargo/,   http://my.firedoglake.com/cindykouril/2010/04/19/the-story-of-the-law-firm-that-built-its-own-evidence-for-foreclosures/                              http://www.foreclosurehamlet.org/profiles/blogs/caryn-graham-attorney-at-thehttp://www.scribd.com/doc/34557527/Caryn-Graham-attorney-at-the-Law-Office-of-Marshall-Watson-signing-for-MERS, http://www.scribd.com/doc/34557449/Caryn-Graham-attorney-at-the-Law-Office-Of-Marshall-Watson-signing-for-MERS-on-assignment-of-mortgage, http://api.ning.com/files/6MrupP07zeOCtzJg1hjlQO0cgPH7AuDLhu4YlaW6JY3dPdA*I0L*wavvUccY*IDQ01m78tWzagio6ve-ulgmZgNmdvgNFF7I/Grahamv2.pdf, http://www.foreclosurehamlet.org/profiles/blogs/protecting-caryn-graham-and-oh,  

Patricia Arango– employee/attorney of Marshall C. Watson, see-  http://4closurefraud.org/2011/01/12/bam-full-deposition-of-patricia-arango-of-marshall-c-watson-arangos-testimony-contradicts-congressional-testimony-of-merscorp-president/ http://my.firedoglake.com/cindykouril/2010/04/19/the-story-of-the-law-firm-that-built-its-own-evidence-for-foreclosures/

C.Troy Crouse a.k.a. Charles Troy Crouse– attorney at McCalla Raymerhttp://www.mccallaraymer.com/index.php?searchword=crouse&ordering=&searchphrase=all&Itemid=73&option=com_search http://www.wsbtv.com/news/25635807/detail.html  http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf  http://dockets.justia.com/search?query=Prommis+Solutions%2C+LLC&circuit=11

http://4closurefraud.org/2010/11/05/georgias-version-of-david-stern-and-friends-mccalla-raymer-charles-troy-crouse-and-prommis-solutions/ http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction  http://www.lawyers.com/Georgia/Atlanta/McCalla-Raymer,-LLC-885136-f.html http://www.mccallaraymer.com/

Crystal Wilder– notary- employee at McCalla Raymer- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction  http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf  http://dockets.justia.com/search?query=Prommis+Solutions%2C+LLC&circuit=11

Chiquita Raglin– Notary Public and as an employee of McCalla Raymer- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf  http://dockets.justia.com/search?query=Prommis+Solutions%2C+LLC&circuit=11  

Victoria Marie Allen– Notary Public and as an employee of McCalla Raymer- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf  

Iris Gisella Bey–  Notary Public and as an employee of McCalla Raymer- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf

Jamelia Reynolds, Notary Public and as an employee of McCalla Raymer- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf

Latasha Daniel, Notary Public and as an employee of McCalla Raymer- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf  

Elizabeth Lofaronotary- employee at McCalla Raymer- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction  http://www.operationrest.org/xSites/Agents/OperationRestorationInc/Content/UploadedFiles/ClassActionLawSuit.pdf

Carla Tinoco– employee of Ocwen- false notary- http://livinglies.wordpress.com/2010/03/27/juan-pardo-mersocwen-cross-employment/  

Rhonda Weston– one of 10,000 listed Vice Presidents for Bank of America. see affidavit on Exhibit “B” at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/10/24/ohio-woman-sues-bank-of-america-robo-signer-fannie-mae-ag-cordray/,     http://www.msfraud.org/fraudsterlist.html 

 Dhurata Doko–  employee of Nationwide Title Clearing–see video deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/07/video-deposition-of-nationwide-title-clearing-dhurata-doko/ 

different signatures, see http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Doko_Dhurata.pdf. http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Doko_Dhurata.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Doko_Dhurata.4.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Doko_Dhurata.5.pdf,  

Roderick Sedahttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick_1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick.3.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick.4.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick.5.pdf,

Erica Johnson-Seck a/k/a Erica A. Johnson-Seck – see full deposition at http://4closurefraud.org/2009/11/15/full-deposition-of-the-infamous-erica-johnson-seck-re-indymac-federal-bank-fsb-plaintiff-vs-israel-a-machado-50-2008-ca-037322xxxx-mb/  IndyMac Bank (years after IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. ceased to exist, many of the signers will sign as officers of IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. (the entity that should have made the assignment to the trust years earlier)

Bryan Bly-employee at Nationwide Title Clearing. See video deposition at  http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/07/video-deposition-of-nationwide-title-clearing-bryan-bly/

Hollan M. Fintel– Attorney for Florida Default Group and Shapiro & Fishman, utilizing false credentials, robo-signing, and supervising robo-signing, See full deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/WB1_FULL_DEPOSITION_-of_HOLLAN-FINTEL_-former-associate-attorney-of-Florida-Default-Law-Group.-Executed-assignment-of-mortgage-as-vice-president-of-Wells-Fargo-Bank-N.A..pdf 

Erin Cullaro– former attorney for Florida Default GroupEmployee of Florida’s Attorney General’s Office while notarizing  and filing false affidavits for former employer during A.G. investigation.  See http://www.zerohedge.com/article/florida-notary-fraud-erin-cullaro-%E2%80%93-scandalous-%E2%80%93-substantiated-allegations-foreclosure-fraud  http://www2.tbo.com/content/2010/may/01/bz-state-ag-investigates-its-own/, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Cullaro_Erin.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Cullaro_Erin.1.JPG, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Cullaro_Erin.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Cullaro_Erin.6.pdf,  http://mattweidnerlaw.com/blog/2010/03/bombshell-substantiated-allegations-of-foreclosureaffidavit-fraud-that-implicates-the-florida-attorney-generals-office/, ,

See multiple signatures for Erin Cullaro:  http://4closurefraud.org/2010/10/21/bout-time-ags-office-reprimands-erin-cullaro-for-foreclosure-mill-work/, http://www.woodwardlaw.com/foreclosure-news/erincollinscullarocaughtlyingtothecourtagainhttp://myfloridalegal.com/webfiles.nsf/WF/MRAY-7P5HJP/$file/AttorneyDebtServicesAVC.pdfhttp://www.mediation-drz.com/FORECLOSURE_PROCESS.html,

Tamara Savery– Wells Fargo/ASC employee. See full depo at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/WM_FULL-DEPOSITION-TRANSCRIPT-OF-WELLS-FARGO-TAMARA-SAVERY.pdf 

Angela Nolan– V.P. with Chase. See full depo at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Deposition_of_Angela_Nolan.pdf http://www.scribd.com/doc/27975756/Full-Deposition-of-Angela-Nolan-Robo-Signer-at-Chase-Home-Finance-DeUTSCHE-BANK-NATIONAL-TRUST-COMPANY 

Beth Cottrell– Employee of Lenders Processing Services, claims is an employee of Chase, robo-signer, signed false affidavits, never had personal knowledge of contents. See full depo of May 18, 2010 at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/BETH-COTTRELL-CHASE-HOME-FINANCE.pdf

 http://api.ning.com/files/4jnqlbCXwfs3Z3-ENgcbtAI8PtVjEEe18j-hetj0ZLHpOAhU*wooq8prvl7jmLs7P8e21Ao4FVmONCwYSba49IFrvpTt9701/CookandCottrellUSBankNAatFLehman7109.pdf 

Jeffrey Stephan– One of the largest robo-signers in the country, approx. 400 per week. See depo at  http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Deposition_of_Jeffrey_Stephan.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stephan_Jeffrey.BMP,

Krystal Hall– robo signer, see full deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/DEPOSITION_OF_KRYSTAL-HALL.pdf 

Stacy Spohn– Employee of Lenders Processing Services. See http://4closurefraud.org/2010/09/29/can-it-be-true-fraud-digest-mortgage-fraud-jpmorgan-chase-barbara-hindman-et-al/#comments 

Crystal Moore–  employee at Nationwide Title Clearing. See signatures at http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Doko_Dhurata.3.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Doko_Dhurata.4.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Doko_Dhurata.5.pdf,  See video deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/07/sff-exclusive-video-deposition-of-nationwide-title-crystal-moore/ 

http://search.wn.com/?template=cheetah-search-adv/index.txt&action=search&results_type=news&search_string=crystal moore robosigner deposition on mortgage fraud of 4mp4&language_id=1&sort_type=-pub-datetime&corpus=current&search_type=expression 

Margaret Dalton– Employee of Lenders Processing Services. See http://4closurefraud.org/2010/09/29/can-it-be-true-fraud-digest-mortgage-fraud-jpmorgan-chase-barbara-hindman-et-al/#comments,  http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/  

SIGNED AFFIDAVIT BY AN EXPERT http://whatsignature.com/files/Affidavit_of_Robo-Signer_Margaret_Dalton.pdf

Christina Allen– see http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/

 Alfonzo Greene– see http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/

Laura Hescott– See http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hescott_Laura.pdf, and http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/03/12/topako-love-laura-hescott-christina-allen-eric-tate-officers-of-way-way-too-many-banks-part-deux-the-twilight-zone/ 

Bethany Hood– see http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hood_Bethany.GIF, http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/ http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo  

Barbara Hindman– Too many jobs at the same time http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.1.JPG, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.4.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.5.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.6.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.8.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.9.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.10.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.11.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.12.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.13.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.16.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Hindman_Barbara.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thievin_Shelley.JPG, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thievin_Shelley.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick_1.pdf http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Seda_Roderick.3.pdf, http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/,  

http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/YEHiDw-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/AssignmentofMortgage.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/MTF5p2-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/MTF5p2-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nl6WZo-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/K8LQQ4-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/YEHiDw-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/AssignmentofMortgage.pdf.pdf

Shelley Thievenhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thievin_Shelley.JPG, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thievin_Shelley.1.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thievin_Shelley.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thieven_Shelley.7.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/AssignmentofMortgage.pdf.pdf,

Zuhra Huftio–  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huftio_Zuhra.JPGhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huftio_Zuhra.1.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huftio_Zuhra.2.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huftio_Zuhra.3.pdf,

Linda Green– employee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia, see different signature at http://www.frauddigest.com/TOO_MANY_JOBS.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.1.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.2.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.4.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thomas_Tywanna.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thomas_Tywanna.3.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.1.pdf,   http://www.myprivateaudio.com/11_Trust_Assignment_Fraud_Letter_to_SEC.doc , http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Cf2fyq-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/JkM4KF-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Linda%20Green%20no%20authority%20to%20sign%20on%20behalf%20of%20MERS%20Sept%202009.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/QHOlVR-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Registry%20of%20Deeds.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Untitled.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/VErRd8-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/green%20titles.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/l%20green.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Registry%20of%20Deeds.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Untitled.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_590_16232253_img.pdf, http://www.progressivenewsdaily.com/?p=10012 http://api.ning.com/files/aqSARSiTkefAl9393gVzsI3f4SH1*K1goYHMlptGDfY6PAwGI82Ew0u8u0YJVF82HF8Gbyo90CbsDap8NovcnUFMr36wxshl/JessicaOhdesignaturesamples.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/znwiYjn7FBGiR1q-G6aV1ttAWTjihjjK9WabIYLkCOgT4Hr7uzRUybEIxH6Grn-fe8TaUVTcQwhP1Zp-Xh8F0buIGRwrE3m5/LindaGreen5signaturesamples.pdf  – 5 different signatures

NO AUTHORITY: http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Linda%20Green%20no%20authority%20to%20sign%20on%20behalf%20of%20MERS%20Sept%202009.pdf. http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Corrective+Assignment%5b2%5d.pdf,

Karrel Harp–  employee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia http://www.frauddigest.com/TOO_MANY_JOBS.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.3.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.4.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thomas_Tywanna.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thomas_Tywanna.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.1.pdf,  http://www.myprivateaudio.com/11_Trust_Assignment_Fraud_Letter_to_SEC.doc , ,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/FCOT4y-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/JkM4KF-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/QHOlVR-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/RQndQL-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/VErRd8-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/W6XJgC-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/green%20titles.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/t%20thomas.pdf, http://api.ning.com/files/aqSARSiTkefAl9393gVzsI3f4SH1*K1goYHMlptGDfY6PAwGI82Ew0u8u0YJVF82HF8Gbyo90CbsDap8NovcnUFMr36wxshl/JessicaOhdesignaturesamples.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/wcUUmX7oCvO2NtBWk4POMcHmea0acZWXrXKaYOW0K0h-mufX1-k3mk1GX*WGvcLM9frbdOD8LioPGYOg6gu1-yL82y-WI4S3/KorellHarpSignatureSamples.pdf

Jessica Ohde– employee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/VErRd8-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf, http://api.ning.com/files/aqSARSiTkefAl9393gVzsI3f4SH1*K1goYHMlptGDfY6PAwGI82Ew0u8u0YJVF82HF8Gbyo90CbsDap8NovcnUFMr36wxshl/JessicaOhdesignaturesamples.pdf  – 5different signatures http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/

 

Tawanna Thomasemployee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia , see different signatures at http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.2.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thomas_Tywanna.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thomas_Tywanna.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thomas_Tywanna.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.pdf,  http://www.myprivateaudio.com/11_Trust_Assignment_Fraud_Letter_to_SEC.doc , http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/t%20thomas.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/l%20green.pdf,  http://www.progressivenewsdaily.com/?p=10012  http://api.ning.com/files/znwiYjn7FBGiR1q-G6aV1ttAWTjihjjK9WabIYLkCOgT4Hr7uzRUybEIxH6Grn-fe8TaUVTcQwhP1Zp-Xh8F0buIGRwrE3m5/LindaGreen5signaturesamples.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/aqSARSiTkee3tbDeMIFoHE4wu1iHuumF-uiTADvL*knBNwLuoZg8h*a5CYRPbQbQtPiu2qQOgXIx58z8lsR3FMFtVwNko7hy/TywannaThomassignaturesamples.pdf  http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/  

Tawanna Thomas – TOO MANY JOBS http://www.frauddigest.com/TOO_MANY_JOBS.pdf,   http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Cf2fyq-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/FCOT4y-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/JkM4KF-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/QHOlVR-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/RQndQL-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/W6XJgC-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/green%20titles.pdf,  http://www.progressivenewsdaily.com/?p=10012  http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/

Jessica Leeteemployee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia. See http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Untitled.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_590_16232253_img.pdf,  

Shelley Scheffey– see http://www.frauddigest.com/TOO_MANY_JOBS.pdf,

Linda Thorsen–  employee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Green_Linda.4.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Thoresen_Linda.1.pdf,

Christina Huang–  employee of Lenders Processing Services, Fulton County Georgia http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huang_Christina.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huang_Christina.1.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huang_Christina.2.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Huang_Christina.3.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/Cf2fyq-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdfhttp://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/FCOT4y-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/JkM4KF-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/RQndQL-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/W6XJgC-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/green%20titles.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/t%20thomas.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/l%20green.pdf,

Dawn Williams– employee of Lenders Processing Services, Fulton County, Georgia http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/l%20green.pdf,

Cecelia Knox–  SEE http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/  http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/

 Topako Love– See http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/03/12/topako-love-laura-hescott-christina-allen-eric-tate-officers-of-way-way-too-many-banks-part-deux-the-twilight-zone/, http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/                              http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/                                                                        http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html 

Christine Allen– See http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/                http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/03/12/topako-love-laura-hescott-christina-allen-eric-tate-officers-of-way-way-too-many-banks-part-deux-the-twilight-zone/ http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Jodi Sobotta,- see http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/

Eric Tate– See http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/03/12/topako-love-laura-hescott-christina-allen-eric-tate-officers-of-way-way-too-many-banks-part-deux-the-twilight-zone/, http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/,  

Herman John Kennerty – employee of Wells Fargo Bank. False affidavits, see deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Full-Deposition-of-Wells_Fargo_John-Herman-Kennerty.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kennerty_Herman_John.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kennerty_Herman_John.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kennerty_Herman_John.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kennerty_John.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Kennerty_John.1.pdf, http://livinglies.wordpress.com/2010/03/29/caryn-a-graham-%E2%80%93-mers-assistant-secretary-bofa-countrywide-wells-fargo/                                                 http://www.dsnews.com/articles/jpmorgan-halts-foreclosures-robo-signers-appear-commonplace-2010-09-30 http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

Judy Faber–  see full deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/WM_FULL_DEPOSITION_OF_RESIDENTIAL-FUNDING.GMAC_JUDY_FABER.pdf

Renee D. Hertzler– employee of Bank of America. See full deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/WM_FULL_DEPOSITION_TRANSCRIPT_OF_BANK_OF_AMERICA_RENEE_D_HERTZLER.pdf

Robert R. Stoudmire– see signature and false credentials at http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stoudemire_Robert.pdf

Roger Stotts– different signatures and credentials see  at http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stotts_Roger.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stotts_Roger.1.GIF, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stotts_Roger.3.JPG,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stotts_Roger.4.JPG, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stotts_Roger_D.GIF, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Stotts_Roger_D.1.GIF

Tamara Price– see full deposition at http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/WM_FULL-DEPOSITION-OF-CITI-RESIDENTIAL-AMC-TAMARA-PRICE.pdf http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

R.K. Arnold– former  CEO of MERSCORP and Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. Depo taken at the American Association for Justice, Washington, D.C. on September 25, 2009. See http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/MERS-DEPO-OF-CEO-RK-Arnold-2009.pdf

Margaret Dalton– Expert Affidavit by an Attorney, see http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Affidavit_of_Robo-Signer_Margaret_Dalton.pdf,  http://www.frauddigest.com/fraud.php?ident=4663 , http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/YEHiDw-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/forclosure%20deed.pdf.pdf,  

Liquenda Allotey– employee of Lenders Processing Services, Dakota County, MN signing as V.P. of MERS-  unreadable signature http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Unknown_MERS_-_First_Financail_Equities.GIF, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allotey_Liquenda.2.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allen_Greg.4.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allotey_Liquenda.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allotey_Liquenda.4.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allotey_Liquenda.5.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allotey_Liquenda.6.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allotey_Liquenda.7.pdf,

William Hultman–  actual MERS  executive– see full depo at http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/MERS%20VP%20William%20Hultman%20Deposition%20NJ.pdf,

Greg Allenhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allen_Greg.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allen_Greg2.1.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allen_Greg2.2.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allen_Greg.3.pdf, http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allen_Greg.4.pdfhttp://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allen_Greg.5.pdf,  http://www.whatsignature.com/files/Allotey_Liquenda.5.pdf,

Tam Doanhttp://money.cnn.com/2010/10/28/real_estate/robosigner/index.htm, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/10/28/tam-doan-robosigner-bank-of-america_n_775225.htmlhttp://realestate.about.com/b/2010/10/28/tam-doan-i-was-a-bank-of-america-robosigner-oct-28-2010.htm,

Stanley Silvadeposition http://4closurefraud.org/2011/01/21/more-wells-fargo-woes-full-deposition-of-stanley-silva-notice-of-default-robo-signer/#comment-18380

Nate Blackstun– – employee of CitiBank – http://mattweidnerlaw.com/blog/2010/07/the-new-foreclosure-fraud-battleground-fraud-and-motions-to-disqualify-counsel/

Jamie Hardcastle– employee of CitiBank – http://mattweidnerlaw.com/blog/2010/07/the-new-foreclosure-fraud-battleground-fraud-and-motions-to-disqualify-counsel/

Steven Nagyhttp://www.scribd.com/doc/20887303/New-Century-Mortgage-Forgeries-Notarized-Illegal-Stamped-Signatures-Newsletter-Nagy  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/0LNWLQ-ShowPDF.aspx.pdf.pdf http://4closurefraud.org/2011/01/09/fraudclosuregate-grandma-in-california-does-some-sleuthing-and-uncovers-major-robo-notary-violations/

NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING COMPANY – FULL DEPOSITION http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

TICOR TITLE – FULL DEPOSITION http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

 

JUDGE SCHACK’S ( NY )FAVORITE ROBO-SIGNERS

Rosa C. Larahttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Tamara Pricehttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Christopher M. Zeishttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

John Shelleyhttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Ely Harlesshttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Jeff Rivashttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Cathy Menchisehttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Bryan Kusichhttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Margery Rotundohttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Jessica Dybashttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Albert Fiorellohttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Victor F. Parisihttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Leo Ortega, Jr.- http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Keri Selmanhttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

Joe Lanninghttp://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/

ROBO SIGNERS BY LOCATION AND/OR  COMPANY

Bank of America’s Robo-Signer Listhttp://www.scribd.com/doc/40927249/Bank-Of-America-Robo-signer-List

Tom Croft-employee of  Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC – Orange County CA.

G. Soberanis– employee of  Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC  and signer for Deutsche Bank– Orange County CA

Rachel Warmack– employee of  Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC – signing as VP of Option One Mortgage Corporation, Orange County, CA

Gino Tomasino – signing as Assistant Secretary of American Home Mortgage Servicing, Orange County, CA

Smith, Hiatt & Diaz –  Broward County, Florida http://whatsignature.com/files/Smith_Hiatt_Diaz_P.A._-_unknown_signature.JPG

Valerie Broom– employee of  Lender Processing Services, Duval County, Florida

Margaret Dalton- employee of  Lender Processing Services, Duval County, Florida

Michele Halyard- employee of  Lender Processing Services, Duval County, Florida

Michael Hunt- employee of  Lender Processing Services, Duval County, Florida

Joseph Kaminsky- employee of  Lender Processing Services, Duval County, Florida

Coleman Stokes – employee of  Lender Processing Services, Duval County, Florida

Tara Stabile– employee of Shapiro & Fishman, LLP signing as Vice President and Asst. Secretary of MERS for America’s Wholesale Lender, Hillsborough County, Florida

Scott Anderson– employee of  Ocwen Loan Servicing Palm Beach County, Florida http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_978_16592874_img.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_363_16824558_img.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_625_17027721_img.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_646_17433704_img.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_52_17505354_img.pdf.pdf,

Oscar Taveras– employee of  Ocwen Loan Servicing Palm Beach County, Florida, http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_52_17505354_img.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_646_17433704_img.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_52_17505354_img.pdf.pdf,

Doris Chapman– employee of  Ocwen Loan Servicing Palm Beach County, Florida, http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_52_17505354_img.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_52_17505354_img.pdf.pdf,

Leticia Ariasemployee of  Ocwen Loan Servicing Palm Beach County, Florida, http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html  http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_978_16592874_img.pdf.pdf, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_363_16824558_img.pdf,

Dana Moore– employee of Owen Laon Servicing, Palm Beach, County, Florida, http://www.frauddigest.com/indictments/nv_978_16592874_img.pdf.pdf,

Jonathan Burgess– employee of  Ocwen Loan Servicing Palm Beach County, Florida http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Laura Buxton– employee of  Ocwen Loan Servicing Palm Beach County, Florida http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Rebecca Winner– employee at Shapiro & Fishman, LP, Palm Beach County, Florida http://whatsignature.com/files/Shapiro_Fishman_LLP.1.GIF http://whatsignature.com/files/Shapiro_Fishman_LLP.GIF

Bryan Bly– employee of  Nationwide Title Clearing,  Pinellas County Florida http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Vilma Castro– employee of  Nationwide Title Clearing,  Pinellas County Florida http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Mary Jo McGowan – employee of  Nationwide Title Clearing,  Pinellas County Florida, signing as Asst V.P. Washington Mutual Bank

Dhurato Doko– employee of  Nationwide Title Clearing,  Pinellas County Florida, more above  http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Jessica Fretwell– employee of  Nationwide Title Clearing,  Pinellas County Florida and others http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Cheryl Thomas– employee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia,

Christie Baldwin– employee of Lenders Processing, Fulton County Georgia

Darin Bueltelsigning as V.P. Wells Fargo Financial, Polk County, IA

Kevin Butterweggesigning as V.P. Wells Fargo Financial, Polk County, IA 

Topeka Love– employee of Lenders Processing Services, Dakota County, MN

Christine Anderson- employee of Lenders Processing Services, Dakota County, MN

Dory or Dorey Goebel – employee of Lenders Processing Services, signing as Asst. Secretary of Option One Mortgage, Dakota County, MN

Christine Allen- employee of Lenders Processing Services, Dakota County, MN

Mark Bischop-  is a FIS Foreclosure Solutions notary from Dakota County, MN.

Eric Tate- employee of Lenders Processing Services, Dakota County, MN

Michael Ackerman– attorney at Zucker, Goldberg and Ackerman, NJ

Christina Trowbridge– employee of Chase Home Finance, Franklin County, OH, http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/09/29/here-comes-jpmorgan-chase-lender-processing-services-and-its-robo-signers/ http://api.ning.com/files/tlbopfq3IZ0rstKpWUwhKXuuhfsfFdGnDCFaVjhwU3zbo1YTXQHRy8OczkZTiaqKRsnKVwKz4vaDqg6H1IIk-2DS1sQryfJW/TowbridgeandCookChaseBankUSA6809.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/wwpdBrEz4Fz-ltD8ICz0te23fyFAAGjKHhznRJQEvlZXVqIAZoaEIGle2NJI7vHqmdid7QnQRFOmmRNiiT7RHzomi7tJV7tr/TowbridgeandCookJPMorganChaseBank122008.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/i0L51jUXROyI7sEHaUnVJtPbmqwdSlsf*XSl1ERD2xNKyqL9pmmYfqXKxJdvfwUB8iMy4HLlR-WsO3JtdNSu7pyfcdQvHwJI/TowbridgeandCookMERS52109.pdf

Whitney Cook– employee of Chase Home Finance, Franklin County, OH http://api.ning.com/files/gDnjnrj7Oj3riU2vVL9qsIcGIPTDad8znRRP*ea0YuASQtrKdQyOGeislELEw5Ix5JRpbYlqcPEuFHtqok4oY4YfkDEPFNuU/CookADO2.pdf http://api.ning.com/files/V33VP3LtT7615dwidPPUxlEKbZj-YQSviH8ywJqApvfZpFXgx9zVrJuuuWP-21L1*C*MPu56UbTvw7rr5VNe6gRbluekNIEa/CookCitibankEMC1_0003.pdf http://api.ning.com/files/4jnqlbCXwfs3Z3-ENgcbtAI8PtVjEEe18j-hetj0ZLHpOAhU*wooq8prvl7jmLs7P8e21Ao4FVmONCwYSba49IFrvpTt9701/CookandCottrellUSBankNAatFLehman7109.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/qwWP9H3ypGk*9U3tdBjULSquKCZaoH3hzp4GvpzbMFdYMAEHq7zsswHu5IkVQf02Q6t2q0LeZT-Qjs-spA9ZgTQXPBLjHE-N/CookandTowbridgeJPMorganChase52109.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/wwpdBrEz4Fz-ltD8ICz0te23fyFAAGjKHhznRJQEvlZXVqIAZoaEIGle2NJI7vHqmdid7QnQRFOmmRNiiT7RHzomi7tJV7tr/TowbridgeandCookJPMorganChaseBank122008.pdf http://api.ning.com/files/V33VP3LtT74vil7ye2kM4fb2kCnMyuszQ*YFk2W*lfMo6wy2qraegqrVisqOC6bqgI9w9ypw5kpFoO5pfuR5EuATeQiP-Jty/CookChaseBankNA12262008.pdf http://api.ning.com/files/gDnjnrj7Oj2sd8XrmTJLhSU8a-Xxp6wUDZGhZgvoEDmTIWXApXesiwh9X1n6d5VZlRlo1N8Qqxdc-v11R*QdGgr1N6O40MsA/CookChaseBankUSA82808.pdf http://api.ning.com/files/X1iGwvmnVRnZilM1l5ptzXKUJiG-*7K*aSyaTasWFKAR22*pr0iDks5vDLsCCB8RfW7I4qv57pSOze06AMOZfJ0hxm8TXwFR/CookChaseHomeFinance22509.pdf http://api.ning.com/files/HYdFdD9AInlkIIyoxOmR5Cb54FLjpkrPE-1FZKvc7V8lld59iIwVLaSZb-Qm17VrZs5py6XUteMlsUR-FZKYtIYiH8kGdLtV/CookMERS4909.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/tlbopfq3IZ0rstKpWUwhKXuuhfsfFdGnDCFaVjhwU3zbo1YTXQHRy8OczkZTiaqKRsnKVwKz4vaDqg6H1IIk-2DS1sQryfJW/TowbridgeandCookChaseBankUSA6809.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/i0L51jUXROyI7sEHaUnVJtPbmqwdSlsf*XSl1ERD2xNKyqL9pmmYfqXKxJdvfwUB8iMy4HLlR-WsO3JtdNSu7pyfcdQvHwJI/TowbridgeandCookMERS52109.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/qwWP9H3ypGnbgiBwiJxGflMKRoYt7Ij*LAZ71D*LO8UDNshAyR-ESB2r7XsETxGyDKCTVm3Ph9kTg3dS4oUOVDswPzN-jOSG/WhitneyKCookMERSAmnet2009MWAsg.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/HYdFdD9AInnaws6IJl6aLRPpbREuttbV2el5CAg5SZ-r3-H1Ud2QUSC2xo1zSxmAaV7JZgINGve3lPh*yenlAR3hA2fgq3Hn/2009.12.22PLWhitneyKCookResptoDFsInterr.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/Xt0W0vH8Dd6JTnuTtSHrH*Zw-ibhKCrFaaYetgNCSxa9erbDwER-Qj8jwqT3zPYj5*dw5pFcs8cjeGSf1mbo2bZJenG5cADk/CookVerification0603.pdf  http://api.ning.com/files/RDFm1oi-lqT4WIIV9acxA4SgAuHsyeUvmCH78T1-6t7habrP*NEKKJD3ID5A1MTWrwwRxsamKRVX80k01NMQLQuO3Vn-EXp4/WhitneyKCookAllonge.pdf

Kevin Prieshoff- signing as Asst. Secretary & V.P. of MERS, Hamilton County, OH

Laura Carroll– Foreclosure Specialist for Home Loan Services, Allegheny County, PA

John Kerr– GMAC / Homecomings, Montgomery County, PA http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

China Brown– employee of  America’s Servicing Company, York County, SC http://www.frauddigest.com/fraud.php?ident=4670  http://whatcomforum.blogspot.com/2010/10/wells-fargo-and-its-robo-signers-must.html http://wfhmcaught.blogspot.com/2010/10/oh-good-grief-wells-fargo-will-you.html http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/                                                          http://www.dsnews.com/articles/jpmorgan-halts-foreclosures-robo-signers-appear-commonplace-2010-09-30                                                  http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-11-01/wells-fargo-foreclosure-robo-signer-draws-maryland-dismissal-motion.html                                  http://stopforeclosurefraud.com/2010/11/16/mind-blowing-judge-schack-names-robo-signers-in-many-foreclosure-cases-greatest-hits/ http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

Xee Moua– employee of  America’s Servicing Company, York County, SC http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-11-01/wells-fargo-foreclosure-robo-signer-draws-maryland-dismissal-motion.html  http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

Noriko Colstonhttp://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

Natasha Clark – Employee of America’s Servicing Company, York County, SC- signing as V.P. Washington Mutual Bank                                           http://whatcomforum.blogspot.com/2010/10/wells-fargo-and-its-robo-signers-must.html http://www.veritasaudits.com/blog/tag/intentional-misrepresentation/ http://wfhmcaught.blogspot.com/2010/10/oh-good-grief-wells-fargo-will-you.html

Heather Carrico- employee of America’s Servicing Company, York County, SC http://whatcomforum.blogspot.com/2010/10/wells-fargo-and-its-robo-signers-must.html http://wfhmcaught.blogspot.com/2010/10/oh-good-grief-wells-fargo-will-you.html

Micall Bachman a.k.a. Michelle Bachman– signing as V.P. of Argent Mortgage, Collin County, TX- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/12/10/robo-signers-threaten-foreclosure-lawyers_n_795291.html                                                              http://www.scribd.com/doc/40927249/Bank-Of-America-Robo-signer-List http://washingtonexaminer.com/nep/2010/11/robo-signing-mers-issues-create-new-concerns-foreclosure-buyers

Marti Noriega- employee of  Litton Loan Servicing, LP, Harris County, TX- http://whatsignature.com/files/Unknown_-_from_South_Carolina.pdf  http://www.deanmostofi.com/?p=924

Denise Bailey– employee of  Litton Loan Servicing, LP, Harris County, TX http://www.housingwire.com/2010/11/12/florida-court-robo-signing-not-sufficient-to-stop-foreclosure                                                                      http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html                                                    http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/

Diane Dixon– employee of  Litton Loan Servicing, LP, Harris County, TX- http://foreclosureblues.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/the-dirty-dozen-banks-most-responsible-for-foreclosure-fraud/

D.M. Wileman– signing as VP of MERS, Tarrant County, TX

Brian Burnett– employee of  IndyMac Bank Home Loan Servicing, Travis County, TX- http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Kristen Kemp– employee of  IndyMac Bank Home Loan Servicing, Travis County, TX http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Suchan Murray – employee of  IndyMac Bank Home Loan Servicing, Travis County, TX http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Chamagne Williams– employee of  IndyMac Bank Home Loan Servicing, Travis County, TX http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Dennis Kirkpatick– employee of  IndyMac Bank,  Williamson County, TX (years after IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. ceased to exist, many of the signers will sign as officers of IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. (the entity that should have made the assignment to the trust years earlier) http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Eric Friedman- IndyMac Bank (years after IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. ceased to exist, many of the signers will sign as officers of IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. (the entity that should have made the assignment to the trust years earlier)                           http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Luisa Alfonso– employee of Select Portfolio Servicing, Salt Lake County, UT http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Bill Koch- employee of Select Portfolio Servicing, Salt Lake County, UT http://pippinghole.blogspot.com/2010/12/robo-signers-signors-names-revealed.html

Pam January- signer for CR Title and CitiMortgage              http://www.loansafe.org/forum/citi-mortgage/36803-mers-robo-citimortgage-sold-loan-pennymac-aug-2010-a.html

Lisa Markham– signer for CR Title, CitiMortgage and Deutsche Bank http://www.loansafe.org/forum/citi-mortgage/36803-mers-robo-citimortgage-sold-loan-pennymac-aug-2010-a.html

Tam Doan- signer at Bank of America               http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/10/28/tam-doan-robosigner-bank-of-america_n_775225.html                                            http://realestate.about.com/b/2010/10/28/tam-doan-i-was-a-bank-of-america-robosigner-oct-28-2010.htm

Chris Jones –  http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

Brenda McKinzyhttp://www.deanmostofi.com/?p=924 http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/banking-financial-institutions/122195-bank-of-america-suspends-foreclosure-proceedings-in-23-states

Daniella Marie Garretthttp://www.deanmostofi.com/?p=924  http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/banking-financial-institutions/122195-bank-of-america-suspends-foreclosure-proceedings-in-23-states

Debra Lymanhttp://www.deanmostofi.com/?p=924 http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/banking-financial-institutions/122195-bank-of-america-suspends-foreclosure-proceedings-in-23-states

John Crandallhttp://www.deanmostofi.com/?p=924 http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/banking-financial-institutions/122195-bank-of-america-suspends-foreclosure-proceedings-in-23-states http://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo

Leigh Blackwellhttp://www.deanmostofi.com/?p=924 http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/banking-financial-institutions/122195-bank-of-america-suspends-foreclosure-proceedings-in-23-states

Martha Kunkle– died in 1995-see http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204204004576049902142690400.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

Melissa Bellhttp://www.deanmostofi.com/?p=924  http://www.massrealestatelawblog.com/2010/10/02/major-lenders-halt-foreclosures-over-concerns-with-faulty-documents/  http://livinglies.wordpress.com/2010/11/05/georgia-notary-fraud-revealed-by-tv-investigation/  http://thehill.com/blogs/on-the-money/banking-financial-institutions/122195-bank-of-america-suspends-foreclosure-proceedings-in-23-states http://homesolutioncounselors.com/indymac-onewest-time-to-halt-foreclosures

Stanley Silvahttp://www.gastonforeclosures.org/full_deposition_transcript_of_ticor_title_stanley_silva__notice_of_defaults__lps__fidelity__mers__wells_fargo 

BANK OF AMERICA ROBO-SIGNERS – AS RECORDED IN PUBLIC RECORDS  FILED / EFFECTIVE DATE 3/18/2010  http://www.scribd.com/doc/40927249/Bank-Of-America-Robo-signer-List

Carrie Erbe– Senior Vice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Catherine M. Gorlewski– Senior Vice President Vice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Jeanette Grodsky– Senior Vice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Suzanne M. Haumesser – Senior Vice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Cynthia A. Mach– Senior Vice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Mark Acosta – Senior Vice-President- of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Brandon Sciumbato– Senior Vice President

John S. Smith– Senior Vice President

David P. Sunlin – Senior Vice President

Christine AlbertVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Lisa AllinsonVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Micall  BachmanVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Lance BellVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Donald R. ClarkVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Kimberly DawsonVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Renee HertzlerVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Lancia HerzogVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Mary  LoosVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Mary KistVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Michael PrindleVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Rhoena RiceVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Sheri SolumVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Melissa ViverosVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Rhonda WestonVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Jill WosnakVice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Gregory Higeons – Assistant Vice  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Michele Holtz – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Kaneisha Hunley- Assistant Vice President  of  Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Holly M. Jarmusz – Assistant Vice President of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Deborah A. Jurek – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Barbara Komisarof – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Bridget Lett – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Cody Mahon – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Cheryl Mallory- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Susan McCaughan- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Timothy E. Moran- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Roxanne Nowicki- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Frances Pecoraro- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

David M, Perez- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Laura M. Pirritano – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Tania Ramos – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Robert Rybarczyk- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Ken Satsky- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Joyce Sciumbato – Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Keri Selman- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Teresa Skinner- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

TiaQuanda Turner- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Sandra Williams- Assistant Vice President  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Ashley Barraza – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Destiny Bentley – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Tyira Ganison – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Benjamin Hillis – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Julia Myra- Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Gregory J. Price – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Donna Powell- Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Kathy Repka – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Gail Stein – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Vicki Lynn Vasquez – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Lisa Wickser – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Rachelle Wickware – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

Diane Young – Assistant Secretary  of Bank of America / BAC GP, LLC / BAC Home Loans LP formerly Countrywide Home Loans

ADDITIONAL ALLEGED SIGNERS ALPHABETICAL BY FIRST NAME


Aimee Austin

Amie Davis

Amy Jo Cauthern-Munoz

Amy Payment

Amy Weis

Andrew Keardy

Angela L. Freckman

Andres Rojas

Ann Pinto

Anne Sutcliffe

Annmarie Morrison

Azin Rahmanpanah

Bernadette Polux

Bernice Thell

Beverly Clark

Bharati Lengade

Brian J. LaForest

Brock Martin

Cardless Dixon

Carolyn Mcleod

Cathy Hagstrom

Charmaine Marchesi

Christopher Bray

Chyrs Houston

Clifton Childs

Craig Hanlon

Craig Hinson

Dawn L. Reynolds

Denise A. Marvel

Donna McNaught

Dory or Dorey Goebel

Dulce Diaz

Eileen J. Gonzales

Elizabet Geretschlaeger

Emmanuel Tabot

Erika Reyes

Erika Spencer

Etsuko Kaybeya

Fanessa Fuller

Fedelis Fondunggallah

Felix Amenumey

Fifi Volgarkis

Frank Coon

Gloria Karau

Hang Luu

Hari Charagundla

Indgrid Pittman

Jacqueline Brown

Jamie Bilot

Jamil Kahin

Jan Zimmerman

Janeete Boatman

Janice M. Baker

Jason Dreher

Jason Emory

Jeff Rivas

Jennifer Duncan

Jeremy Cox

Jerrie Moton

Jerry Yang

Joel Martinson

John Cody

Joseph Alvarado

Joseph Lutz

Joseph P. Hillery

Judith Stone

Julie Coon

Katie Zrust

Katrina Bailey

Katrina Whitfield

Katrina Whitfiled-Bailey

Keith Chapman

Keith S. Reno

Kevin Fletcher

Keo Maney Kue Vang

Kim Kenny

Kim Kinney

Kim Mullins

Kim Waldroff

Kimberly Sanford

Kimley Godfrey

Kimbretta Duncan

Kyurstina Lawton

Larry Dingmann

Laura Hescott

Leticia Arias

Lindsay Lesch

Lisa Gerard

Marcia Medley

Margie Kwiatanowsk

 

Marisa G. Carrasco

 

Margery A Rotundo

Marisa Menza

Maya Stevenson

Mellisa Ziertman

Mellissa Mosloski

Melody Moore

Michael Ackerman

Michael H. Moreland

Michael Hanna

Michele Boiko

Michelle Flores

Michelle Halyard

Mutru Kumar

Natalie Anderson

Neil E. Dyson

Paige Sahr

Pam Anderson

Pam Kammerer

Pam January

Pat Kingston

Paul Bruha

Paul Hunt

Paul Mann-notary

Peggy Glass

Peter Read

R.P. Umali

Rashonda Turner

Rebecca Verdeja

Renae Stanton

Renee L. Hensley

Richard Delgado

Richard Olasande

Rick Wilken

Robert E. Kaltenbach

Robyn Colburn

Rodney Cadwell

Rona Ramos

Roy Stringfellow

Sakhada Lad

Salena Edwards

Sara Rubin

Sarah Block

Sarah Rubin

Scott Anderson

Scott Keller

Scott W. Anderson

September Stoudemire

Sheri Bongaarts

Shivani L. Ram

Silvia Marchan

Steve A. Nielsen

Steve Ballman

Steve Moe

Steven Grount

Sue Fillczkowski

Susan Nightingale

Tam Doan

Tammy Brooks-Saleh

Tammy Saleh

Taylor Moore

Teresa DeBaker

Tina Jones

Tishana Gibbs

Toccoa Lenair

Treva Moreland

Van Johnson

Varsha Thakkar

Verdine A Freeman

Vicki Kyle

Victor Perez

Vinod Vishwakarma

Vishal Karingada

Whitney Lewis

Yvette Day

 


 

ALPHABETICAL LISTING OF ALLEGED ROBO-SIGNERS* AND LINKS*

*NOTE: FOR THE NAMES LISTED BELOW, TO FIND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION JUST PLACE YOUR MOUSE ON NAME, PRESS THE CONTROL BUTTON AND LEFT CLICK AT THE SAME TIME AND THE WEBSITE WILL LEAD YOU TO A SUPPORTING DOCUMENT OF THAT PERSON

Allen, Greg       Allen, Greg.1       Allen, Greg.2       

Allen, Greg.4       

Allotey, Liquenda       Allotey, Liquenda.1       

Allotey, Liquenda.3       Allotey, Liquenda.4       

Allotey, Liquenda.6       

Anderson, Christine       Anderson, Christine.1       

Arce, Michael Matthew       

Arias, Leticia

Boytchev, Galina.1       Boytchev, Galina.2       

Brown, China       

Burgess, Jonathan

Castro, Vilma       Castro, Vilma.1       Castro, Vilma.2       

Causevic, Rusmir       

Cavka, Esad       

Chua, James       

Ciarlariello, Carolin       

Clements, Ashley       Clements, Ashley.1       

Clements, Ashley.3

Coats, Stacy

Cody, John       

Costello, Loretta V       

Cullaro, Erin (appointment to Assistant State Attorney General – March 4, 1996

Cullaro, Erin       Cullaro, Erin.1       Cullaro, Erin.2       

Cullaro, Erin.4       Cullaro, Erin.5       Cullaro, Erin.6       

Cullaro, Erin.8       

Cullaro, John       Cullaro, John.1       Cullaro, John, 2       

Cullaro, John.4       Cullaro, John.5       Cullaro, John.6       

Cullaro, Lisa       Cullaro, Lisa.1       Cullaro, Lisa.2       

Cullaro, Lisa.4       Cullaro, Lisa.5       

Cullaro, Lisa.7       Cullaro, Lisa.8        Cullaro, Lisa.9

Dallavalle, Cherita       

Dalton, Margaret       Dalton, Margaret.1       

Dalton, Margaret.3       Dalton, Margaret.4       

Dalton, Margaret.6       Dalton, Margaret.7       

Dalton, Margaret.9       Dalton, Margaret.10       

Davila, Monique       Davila, Monique.1       Davila, Monique.2       

Dhimitri, Alisa       

Doko, Dhurata       Doko, Dhurata.1       Doko, Dhurata.2       

Doko, Dhurata.4       

Douglas, Sarah L

Esposito, Michael Ro

Eubanks, Richard H

Faber, Judy       

Fadil, Ingrid       

Frazier, Brenda       

Freeman, Jacquelyn

Gorman, Kim       

Green, Linda       Green, Linda.1       Green, Linda.2       

Griffith, Scott A       Griffith, Scott A.1       Griffith, Scott A.2       

Guerrero, Irene

 Harvey, Laura       Harvey, Laura.1       

Hosenfeld, Amanda Elizabeth          

Hosenfeld, Amanda Elizabeth.2          

Howard, Caroly

 Hunter, Rose       Hunter, Rose.1       Hunter, Rose.2       

Hutchinson, Cheryl

Johnson, Cherri       

 

Jones, Chris       

Jones, Christopher       

Jones, William C

Kaminski, Joseph       Kaminski, Joseph.1        

Kaminski, Joseph.3       Kaminski, Joseph.4       

Kane, Alexandra       

Kelley, Justin J       Kelley, Justin J.1       Kelley, Justin J.2       

Kelly, Adrienne       

Kennerty, Herman John       Kennerty, Herman John.1       

Kennerty, John       

Kingston, Pat       

Klein, Connie       

Kosciuk, Henry John

Lalovic, Zoran       Lalovic, Zoran.1       

Lamet, Judith       

Layden, Scott G       

Lazzara, Troy       Lazzara, Troy.1       Lazzara, Troy.2       

Leonard, Lynn B       

Love, Topako

Malcomson, Karen       

Manson, Heather       

Marcum, M.L.

Maslak, Michael L       Maslak, Michael L.1       

Maslak, Michael L.3       

McEwen, Wendy       McEwen, Wendy.1       McEwen, Wendy.2       

McEwen, Wendy.4       

McNulty, Deborah A       McNulty, Deborah A.1       

McNulty, Deborah A.3       McNulty, Deborah A.4       

McNulty, Deborah A.6       McNulty, Deborah A.7       

McNulty, Deborah A.9       McNulty, Deborah A.10       

McNulty, Deborah.2       McNulty, Deborah.3       

McNulty, Deborah.5       McNulty, Deborah.6       

Medic, Velida       Medic, Velida.1       Medic, Velida.2       

Mesker, Jonathan       Mesker, Jonathan.1       

Mesker, Jonathan.3       Mesker, Jonathan.4       

Miner, Patricia       Miner, Patricia.1       

Moore, Amy J       

Moore, Crystal       Moore, Crystal.1       Moore, Crystal.2       

Moore, Crystal.4       Moore, Crystal.5       Moore, Crystal.6       

Moore, Crystal.8       Moore, Crystal.9       

Morales, Marisol       

Morris, James C       Morris, James C.1       Morris, James C.2       

Moua, Shoua       Moua, Shoua.1       Moua, Shoua.2       

Munoz, Florina       Munoz, Florina.1       Munoz, Florina.2       

Munoz, Nina       Munoz, Nina.1       Munoz, Nina.2       

Munoz, Nina.4       Munoz, Nina.5       

Muros, Melissa

Nadarevic, Nura       Nadarevic, Nura.1       Nadarevic, Nura.2       

Noriega, Marti

Ohde, Jessica       

Oterino, Mayret

Palermo, Michael James       

Patrick, Steven       

Pekusic, D       

Pidala, Andrea       

Poole, Yolanda

Rice, Ron G., Jr.       Rice, Ron G., Jr.1       

Riley, Cynthia       Riley, Cynthia.1       Riley, Cynthia.2       Riley, Cynthia.

Roe, Abigail       

Rosenthal, Arnold S

Russ, Kirk M
Sears, Thomas A. Esq.- http://www.operationrest.org/GAClassAction

Ustovic, Enso       Ustovic, Enso.1       Ustovic, Enso.2

Vu, Mai

Williams, Darryl K       Williams, Darryl K.1       

Williams, Darryl K.3       

Williams, Dawn       

Williams, Sonya       

Wissner, Karen

 

KNOWN ALLEGED BANKSTERS, FRAUDSTERS, WHITE COLLAR CRIMINALS

And other assorted co-conspirators to

FORECLOSURE FRAUD a.k.a. FRAUDCLOSURE

Ablitt Law Offices, P.C.
Account Portfolios
Accredited Home Lenders
ACORN
Adler & Associates
Aegis Mortgage
AIG
Alegis Group
Alliance Mortgage Group
AllianceOne Receivables Management
AllianceOne, Inc.
Allied Home Mortgage Capital
Allied Interstate
All State Mortgage Lender
ALLTEL

Ally Financial
Altegra Credit Company
Alternative Home Financing
Aman Collection Service
AMC (Ameriquest)
American Alliance for Loan Management
American Coradius
American General Finance
American Home Modifications
American Recovery Systems
American Revenue
American Servicing Company
America’s Mortgage Banc
American Legal Process
America’s Servicing Company
Ameri-CK
Ameridebt
Amerifund Home Mortgage
Ameriquest Mortgage
Amerix
AmNet Mortgage
AMO Recoveries,
Asset Management Outsourcing
Appletree Mortgage
Argent Mortgage (Ameriquest)
Arrow Financial Services
Ashwood Financial
Asset Acceptance Capital Corp
Asset Acceptance Corporation
Asset Protection & Recovery Solutions, L.L.C.
Associated Recovery Systems/ ARS National Services
Associates  (Citigroup)
Atlantic Credit & Finance
Aurora Loan Servicing
Balboa Insurance
Banc Boston Mortgage
Bank of America
Bank of New York
Bank One/Banc One
Bank United
Bankers Trust of California
Barrett – Burke 
Baum Law Firm
Bayview Financial LP
Bear Stearns
Bear Stearns Mortgage (a.k.a. EMC Mortgage)
Beneficial
Beneficial Financial Services
Bennett & Deloney
Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC
Best Interest Rate Mortgage Company
Bierman, Geesing & Ward, LLC
Blatt, Hasenmiller
Blitt & Gaines
Bonded Collection Corporation
Boudreau & Associates
Bowman, Heintz
The Law Office of Brett Margolin PC
Bronson  &Migliaccio, LLP
Brice, Vander Linden & Wernick P.C.
Buchalter Nemer Fields & Younger
Bureaus Investment
Burke, Costanza & Cuppy
Burroughs & Smythe Financial Services
Calmco / Olympus
Cambridge Credit
Cambridge Credit Counseling
Capital City Mortgage
Capital Management Services
Capital Mortgage Services
Capitol Credit Service (Madison, WI)
Castle Meinhold & Stawarski, LLC
Cavalry
C-BASS (Litton Loan Servicing)
CBE Group
CCB Credit Services
Celink
Cendant Mortgage
Cenlar F.S.B
Centex Home Equity
Central Pacific Mortgage
Certegy
CFIC Home Mortgage
Chase Financial Funding
Chase Manhattan Mortgage
Chase Mortgage

Chex Systems
CitiCorp Mortgage
CitiFinancial Mortgage
CitiMortgage
City Finance (Washington Mutual)
Client Services, Inc.
Coalition for Fair and Affordable Housing
Coldata
Collect America, LTD
Collectcorp
Collection Associates
Collins Financial
Comerica Bank
Commercial Credit
Conseco
Consumer Credit Counseling
Consumer Data Industry Association
ConsumerInfo.com
ContiMortgage
Conti-Mortgage
Continental Services
Countrywide Mortgage
CR Title Services
Credit Bureau Enterprises
Credit Collection Service
Credit Management Services
Credit Protection Association
Creditors’ Alliance
Creditors Interchange
Credit Suisse First Boston
Credit Union National Mortgage
Creve Coeur Mortgage
Cross Country Bank
Crossland Mortgage
CSFB
CTX Mortgage Co.
D&B Receivables Mangagement
Tam Doan
Law office of David J.Stern
DebtOne
Debtworks
Decision One Mortgage
Delta Financial

Deutsche Trust (Bankers Trust)
DiTech Funding (.com)
Ditech.com
Diversified Adjustment Services
DJSP Enterprises Inc.
DLJ Mortgage Acceptance
Dovenmuehle Mortgage
Docx
Draper, Goldberg
Dun & Bradstreet RMS
DUNSCOMM
Dymacol
eAppriaseIT
EMC Mortgage Corporation
Emerald Home Loan
EMPIRE MORTGAGE
Encore Capital Group
Encore Receivable
Entrust Financial Services
Epstein & Frisch
Equicredit (NationsBank n.k.a. Bank of America)
Equifirst
Equity One
ER Systems
E*Trade Bank
Everest Consumer Svcs.
Everhome
Experian
Fairbanks Capital (nka – Select Portfolio Servicing (SPS)
FBCS (Philadelphia, PA)
Federal Loan Modification Law Center and Federal Loan Modification
Ferleger & Associates
FedMod

Fein, Such & Crane
Fidelity et al
Fieldstone Mortgage
Fifth Third Bank
Finance America
Financial Asset Management
Financial Credit Corporation
Financial Recovery Services
Financial Resources Mortgage Inc.

First Alliance
First Alliance Mortgage
First American Investment Company
First Beneficial Mortgage
First Capital Mortgage
First Franklin Financial (NCFS)
First Horizon
First Horizon Home LoanL
First Metropolitan Mortgage
First Nationwide Mortgage
First NLC Financial Services
First Pacific Corp.
First Performance Recovery
First Residential Mortgage (Louisville, KY)
First Select Corporation
FlexPoint Funding (HomeFirst)
FLM Law Center LLP
Florida Default Law Group
FMA Enterprises
Fordham Investment Group
ForeclosureLink
Fourscore
Frankel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP
Franklin Credit Management
Franklin Credit Management (FCMC)
Freddie Mac/Fannie Mae
Freemont Investment & Loan
Fulbright & Jaworski
Full Spectrum Lending
FSA
Gateway Bank
GC Services
GE Capital
GE Consumer Finance
Gerald E. Moore & Associates

Tishana Gibbs
GMAC or GMAC Mortgage Corp.
Goldbeck, McCafferty, & McKeever
Goldman Sachs
Grabowski & Greene
Greatstone
Green Light Financial

Greentree Financial
GreenPoint Mortgage
Guaranty Bank
Guaranty Residential Lending
Guaranty Residential Mortgage Corporation
Gulf State Credit
Guyer & Enichen
H&R Block Mortgage
Hammer Financial (Illinois)
Harmon Law Offices, P.C
Harris & Harris
Harvard Collection Services
Heady Financial
H.E. Servicing
HFC (Home Funding Corp.)

HiberniaHirsch & Westheimer
Holland & Knight
HomeBanc Mortgage
Homecomings Financial (GMAC)
Homecomings Financial Network
HomeEq (Wachovia/Money Store)
Homeloan Management Ltd
Homeq Servicing Corp.
HomeSavers USA
Homeside Lending (WAMU-Washington Mutual)
Homestar Mortgage
Household / Beneficial
Household Finance
Housing Assistance Services, Inc. (HAS)
HSBC
Hunt Leibert
I.C. System
Illinois Collection Services
IMC Mortgage
Indecomm Global Services
IndyMac Bank
Innovis
IntelliRisk
Irwin Home Equity
Irwin Union Bank & Trust
J. C. Christensen & Associates
JBC Legal Group (Boyajian)
Jessie Riddle & Associates
Johnson, Rodenburg & Lauinger
Jones Day
Jordan S. Katz, P.C.
J. P. Morgan/Chase
KCA Financial Services
Kramer & Frank
KeyBank
Landsafe
LaSalle Bank (ABN Amro)
Leader Mortgage
Lehman Brothers
Lenahan Law Offices
Lending Tree
Lerner, Sampson & Rothfuss

Liberty Mortgage
Litton Loan Servicing
Loan Arranger (broker)
Loan Giant
Long Beach Mortgage
LTD Financial Services
Luminent Mortgage Capital
M.R.S. Associates
Macey, Wilensky, Cohen
Malcolm S. Gerald & Associates
Mann & StevensMaris & Lanier (Dallas)
Law offices of Marshall C. Watson in Fort Lauderdale
McCalla Raymer
Maverick Acquisition Corp.
M & T Bank
McMahan & Sigunick
MEDCLR
Medical Collection System/ Robert Mistovich
Mercantile Mortgage
Meritage Mortgage
Meritech Mortgage (formerly Saxon)
Merrill Lynch
Merrill Lynch Mortgage
MERS (Mortgage Electronic Registration Services)
Metropolitan Mortgage
MGIC
MidFirst Bank
Midland Credit Management/ MCM
Midland Mortgage
MKM Acquisitions
Morgan Stanley
Mortgage Lenders Network (MLNUSA)
MortgageIT
Moss, Codillis, Stawiarski, Morris, Schneider & Prior
Mozilo, AngeloMR Default
MRS Associates
M & T Bank
National Action Financial Services
National Asset Management Enterprises
National Asset Recovery Services
National City (Altegra)

National Enterprise Systems
National Financial Systems
Nations Credit
NationsBanc/Nationsbank
Nationwide Credit
Nationwide Modification Agency Inc
NB Lending
NCO
NCO Financial Systems
NCO Group

NDEx Technologies, LLC
Network Mortgage Servicing
New Century Financial Services, Inc.
New Century Mortgage
North Fork Bank (GreenTree)
Northland Group
NorWest Mortgage
Novastar
Ocwen/ Ocwen Federal Bank/ Ocwen Financial
Olympus Mortgage (Ameriquest)
Olympus Servicing

One West
Option One Mortgage (H&R Block)
Option One Mortgage (Irvine, Ca.)
Origen
Outsourcing Solutions (OSI)
Pacific Republic Mortgage
PCFS Mortgage Resources
People’s Choice Home Loan
Perry Homes
Peters and Freedman
PHH Mortgage
Phillips & Cohen Associates, Ltd.

Pite Duncan, LLP
Pioneer Credit Recovery
Platinum Financial Services
Platinum Home Mortgage
Plaza Associates
PMI Group
Portfolio Recovery Associates
Portfolio Recovery Services
PRA III, LLC
Principal Residential Mortgage

Pro Com Services
Professional Credit Management
Professional Recovery Systems

Promiss Solutions
Protocol Recovery Service
Provident Bank
Quicken Loans
Quality Loan Service
RBMG
Receivables Management Solutions
Redline Recovery Services
Regent & Associates
Rels Valuation
REMIC
Renaissance Mortgage Acceptance
Residential Loan Centers of America
Resolution Trust Corporation (“RTC”)(1980′s Savings & Loan Scandal)
Revenue Management
Revenue Production Management, Inc. (RPM)
Risk Management Alternatives
RJM (Fingerhut)
ROBO-Signors (see below)
RRReview, Inc
RX Financial

Sand Canyon

Saxon Mortgage
Sagres Co.
Salvatore Spinelli
Saxon Mortgage Services
Schreiber & Associates of Danvers, Massachusetts
Schwartz & Schwartz
Security Finance Corporation of Oklahoma
Security National Servicing
Select Portfolio Servicing – SPS (formerly Fairbanks Capital)
Settleware.com
Shapiro & Fishman in Boca Raton

Shapiro & Fishman in Tampa
Shapiro & Kreisman
Sherman Acquisitions / Alegis
Smith, Hiatt and Diaz
Southwest Credit Corp.

Specialized Loan Services
Summit Mortgage
Sunrise Credit Services
Suntrust Mortgage
Superior Bank
Surpas Resource Corporation
Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp.
Tate & Kirlin Associates
Temple Inland Mortgage
The Associates
Town and Country Credit
TranSouth Financial Corporation
Transworld
Trauner, Cohen & Thomas
U. S. Bank
Unifund
Unifund Group
United Financial Mortgage
United Law Group
Universal Fidelity Corporation
Upland Mortgage
U.S. Bank
U.S. Foreclosure Relief Corporation
U.S. Mortgage Corp.
Valentine & Kebartas
Van Ru Credit
Wachovia Bank
Walinski & Trunkett
Walsh Securities Inc.
Washington Mutual (WAMU)
The Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. (Florida)
Wells Fargo
Weltman, Weinberg
Wendover Financial Services/
Weyerhaeuser Mortgage Co. (WMC)
Williams & Williams
Wilshire Credit Corp
WMC Mortgage

Wolf Law Firm
Wolpoff & Abramson
World Wide Financial Services
Worldwide Asset Management
Worldwide Asset Purchasing

Worldwide Financial Resources
Worldzen
Znet Financial
Zwicker & Associates

Final words: the “Robo” actions are just the tip of the iceberg but the “Robo” actions allowed part of the iceberg to be seen.

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The Top Twelve Reasons Why You Should Hate the Mortgage Settlement

9 Feb

As readers may know by now, 49 of 50 states have agreed to join the so-called mortgage settlement, with Oklahoma the lone refusenik. Although the fine points are still being hammered out, various news outlets (New York Times, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal) have details, with Dave Dayen’s overview at Firedoglake the best thus far.

The Wall Street Journal is also reporting that the SEC is about to launch some securities litigation against major banks. Since the statue of limitations has already run out on securities filings more than five years old, this means they’ll clip the banks for some of the very last (and dreckiest) deals they shoved out the door before the subprime market gave up the ghost.

The various news services are touting this pact at the biggest multi-state settlement since the tobacco deal in 1998. While narrowly accurate, this deal is bush league by comparison even though the underlying abuses in both cases have had devastating consequences.

The tobacco agreement was pegged as being worth nearly $250 billion over the first 25 years. Adjust that for inflation, and the disparity is even bigger. That shows you the difference in outcomes between a case where the prosecutors have solid evidence backing their charges, versus one where everyone know a lot of bad stuff happened, but no one has come close to marshaling the evidence.

The mortgage settlement terms have not been released, but more of the details have been leaked:

1. The total for the top five servicers is now touted as $26 billion (annoyingly, the FT is calling it “nearly $40 billion”), but of that, roughly $17 billion is credits for principal modifications, which as we pointed out earlier, can and almost assuredly will come largely from mortgages owned by investors. $3 billion is for refis, and only $5 billion will be in the form of hard cash payments, including $1500 to $2000 per borrower foreclosed on between September 2008 and December 2011.

Banks will be required to modify second liens that sit behind firsts “at least” pari passu, which in practice will mean at most pari passu. So this guarantees banks will also focus on borrowers where they do not have second lien exposure, and this also makes the settlement less helpful to struggling homeowners, since borrowers with both second and first liens default at much higher rates than those without second mortgages. Per the Journal:

“It’s not new money. It’s all soft dollars to the banks,” said Paul Miller, a bank analyst at FBR Capital Markets.

The Times is also subdued:

Despite the billions earmarked in the accord, the aid will help a relatively small portion of the millions of borrowers who are delinquent and facing foreclosure. The success could depend in part on how effectively the program is carried out because earlier efforts by Washington aimed at troubled borrowers helped far fewer than had been expected.

2. Schneiderman’s MERS suit survives, and he can add more banks as defendants. It isn’t clear what became of the Biden and Coakley MERS suits, but Biden sounded pretty adamant in past media presentations on preserving that.

3. Nevada’s and Arizona’s suits against Countrywide for violating its past consent decree on mortgage servicing has, in a new Orwellianism, been “folded into” the settlement.

4. The five big players in the settlement have already set aside reserves sufficient for this deal.

Here are the top twelve reasons why this deal stinks:

1. We’ve now set a price for forgeries and fabricating documents. It’s $2000 per loan. This is a rounding error compared to the chain of title problem these systematic practices were designed to circumvent. The cost is also trivial in comparison to the average loan, which is roughly $180k, so the settlement represents about 1% of loan balances. It is less than the price of the title insurance that banks failed to get when they transferred the loans to the trust. It is a fraction of the cost of the legal expenses when foreclosures are challenged. It’s a great deal for the banks because no one is at any of the servicers going to jail for forgery and the banks have set the upper bound of the cost of riding roughshod over 300 years of real estate law.

2. That $26 billion is actually $5 billion of bank money and the rest is your money. The mortgage principal writedowns are guaranteed to come almost entirely from securitized loans, which means from investors, which in turn means taxpayers via Fannie and Freddie, pension funds, insurers, and 401 (k)s. Refis of performing loans also reduce income to those very same investors.

3. That $5 billion divided among the big banks wouldn’t even represent a significant quarterly hit. Freddie and Fannie putbacks to the major banks have been running at that level each quarter.

4. That $20 billion actually makes bank second liens sounder, so this deal is a stealth bailout that strengthens bank balance sheets at the expense of the broader public.

5. The enforcement is a joke. The first layer of supervision is the banks reporting on themselves. The framework is similar to that of the OCC consent decrees implemented last year, which Adam Levitin and yours truly, among others, decried as regulatory theater.

6. The past history of servicer consent decrees shows the servicers all fail to comply. Why? Servicer records and systems are terrible in the best of times, and their systems and fee structures aren’t set up to handle much in the way of delinquencies. As Tom Adams has pointed out in earlier posts, servicer behavior is predictable when their portfolios are hit with a high level of delinquencies and defaults: they cheat in all sorts of ways to reduce their losses.

7. The cave-in Nevada and Arizona on the Countrywide settlement suit is a special gift for Bank of America, who is by far the worst offender in the chain of title disaster (since, according to sworn testimony of its own employee in Kemp v. Countrywide, Countrywide failed to comply with trust delivery requirements). This move proves that failing to comply with a consent degree has no consequences but will merely be rolled into a new consent degree which will also fail to be enforced. These cases also alleged HAMP violations as consumer fraud violations and could have gotten costly and emboldened other states to file similar suits not just against Countrywide but other servicers, so it was useful to the other banks as well.

8. If the new Federal task force were intended to be serious, this deal would have not have been settled. You never settle before investigating. It’s a bad idea to settle obvious, widespread wrongdoing on the cheap. You use the stuff that is easy to prove to gather information and secure cooperation on the stuff that is harder to prove. In Missouri and Nevada, the robosigning investigation led to criminal charges against agents of the servicers. But even though these companies were acting at the express direction and approval of the services, no individuals or entities higher up the food chain will face any sort of meaningful charges.

9. There is plenty of evidence of widespread abuses that appear not to be on the attorney generals’ or media’s radar, such as servicer driven foreclosures and looting of investors’ funds via impermissible and inflated charges. While no serious probe was undertaken, even the limited or peripheral investigations show massive failures (60% of documents had errors in AGs/Fed’s pathetically small sample). Similarly, the US Trustee’s office found widespread evidence of significant servicer errors in bankruptcy-related filings, such as inflated and bogus fees, and even substantial, completely made up charges. Yet the services and banks will suffer no real consequences for these abuses.

10. A deal on robosiginging serves to cover up the much deeper chain of title problem. And don’t get too excited about the New York, Massachusetts, and Delaware MERS suits. They put pressure on banks to clean up this monstrous mess only if the AGs go through to trial and get tough penalties. The banks will want to settle their way out of that too. And even if these cases do go to trial and produce significant victories for the AGs, they still do not address the problem of failures to transfer notes correctly.

11. Don’t bet on a deus ex machina in terms of the new Federal foreclosure task force to improve this picture much. If you think Schneiderman, as a co-chairman who already has a full time day job in New York, is going to outfox a bunch of DC insiders who are part of the problem, I have a bridge I’d like to sell to you.

12. We’ll now have to listen to banks and their sycophant defenders declaring victory despite being wrong on the law and the facts. They will proceed to marginalize and write off criticisms of the servicing practices that hurt homeowners and investors and are devastating communities. But the problems will fester and the housing market will continue to suffer. Investors in mortgage-backed securities, who know that services have been screwing them for years, will be hung out to dry and will likely never return to a private MBS market, since the problems won’t ever be fixed. This settlement has not only revealed the residential mortgage market to be too big to fail, but puts it on long term, perhaps permanent, government life support.

As we’ve said before, this settlement is yet another raw demonstration of who wields power in America, and it isn’t you and me. It’s bad enough to see these negotiations come to their predictable, sorry outcome. It adds insult to injury to see some try to depict it as a win for long suffering, still abused homeowners.

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